Calibrated correctly?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Brent_Sch, Mar 21, 2002.

  1. Brent_Sch

    Brent_Sch Stunt Coordinator

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    I gotmy PE 250W plate amp today and also my SPL meter and want to know if I did this correct. I just went ahead and used the receiver internal test tones for calibration.

    My equipment:

    Kenwood VR505

    HTD Level II Speakers (all the way around)

    20-39CS SVS with a 250W PE amp

    I set the SPL to 80db for readings for all the speakers. Then I set it to 90db for readings of the subwoofer. Is that correct? I read through the SVS website and this seemed like the way they had recommended setting your sub. I wanted to set the sub higher for the extra bass as the SVS website claims.

    Also, when adjusting the subwoofer to get to the right of 0db on the spl meter, should I be adjusting the amps volume or the LFE control (it's -10 to 10 on the VR505).

    Thanks for looking.
     
  2. Brent_Sch

    Brent_Sch Stunt Coordinator

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    Also, I just tried using my Sound & Vision setup disk to calibrate and came up with different readings and setting levels than the internal receiver tones. Is this normal? Which should prove more accurate for me?

    Thanks

    Brent
     
  3. Jim_C

    Jim_C Cinematographer

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    http://www.hometheaterforum.com/htfo...threadid=58010
    Check out the link posted by Vin. It leads to a calibration procedure by Vince Maskeeper. VM is the master of calibration explanation.
    I say this with no insult intended, try the search function. This topic, and variations of your question, are asked and answered all the time.
     
  4. Jim_C

    Jim_C Cinematographer

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    >>Also, I just tried using my Sound & Vision setup disk to calibrate and came up with different readings and setting levels than the internal receiver tones. Is this normal? Which should prove more accurate for me?
     
  5. Troy_K

    Troy_K Stunt Coordinator

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    On the S&V disk, try setting levels to 85 db. I wouldn't set your sub much higher than the mains. 10db is too much! Try 2-3db instead if you want it hot. Just don't listen to movies like Star Wars TPM and Toy Story at reference volumes if you sub is hot.

    Troy
     
  6. Brent_Sch

    Brent_Sch Stunt Coordinator

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    I actually sat and read the instruction manual for the spl meter and I realized I have done a few things wrong. I guess it pays to read that instruction manual! I'm going to correct those later today. Thanks for all the replies!
     
  7. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

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    1) While some here will disagree, I will always side with the tones on a test disc like AVIA over the internal receiver tones. My Denon tones are wrong, and I have seen many other products with incorrect tones.

    2) 10db over is very hot for the sub, I'd say 5 would be fine. If you plan to listen at REF level for normal viewing, you probably won't need any boost at all-- but if you plan to listen below ref, 4-5db should be enough boost.

    3) When adjusting your bass levels- there are 3 controls you can use:

    Volume control on the sub

    Sub output on the receiver

    LFE level in receiver setup menu.

    Above, you made ref to "the LFE control" on your receiver-- when I think you were discussing the Sub level (be careful, as they are 2 different things).

    My standard advice is this:

    1) Max out the gain level on the sub itself. In most cases this is simply a filter which cuts input level flowing to the amp (especially true when using outboard pro amps, but often true with plate amps as well)-- so letting signal flow unaltered is usually the best results.

    2) Max out the LFE pad control, this is a different adjustment than the speaker level for the sub. Most receivers have a LFE setting, often it is a toggle between 0/-10... sometimes it's different- refer to your user manual to find it. Max this control out. If you have LFE control for DTS, max it out as well.

    3) Use the subwoofer level control to calibrate. If you are unable to get the signal calibrated (if you get down to -10 on the receiver and the tones are still too loud)- then reduce the gain knob on the sub itself.

    Hope that helps

    V
     
  8. Brent_Sch

    Brent_Sch Stunt Coordinator

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    Ok, I re-did most of the calibrations using the tones on the S&V disc. I did do the sub hot because I never really listen to anything at REF levels. My only question is this. I have the LFE level on -5 as the SVS site says (Kenwood goes from -10 to +10) but to get it to calibrate correctly I had to turn the gain knob way down, only a little more than 1/4 of the way up. Is this correct? Anything else had the spl meter needle "flying" to the right.

    Thanks
     
  9. rodneyH

    rodneyH Supporting Actor

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    why would anyone want to run the SUB "hot" I thought you want the Freq resp to be FLAT? Do you guys like the sound of the mini truck that drives buy with 4 12" drivers that you can hear from 1 mile away (this is an honest ?) or the sound of a true accurate audiophile set up? I gues now I have an idea why people own 2,3, or 4 SVS's, but I only have 1 running 275 w and it rocks my freakin house, I have to have the amp only turned up about 1/4 of the way. Maybe it is b/c I am more Music VS HT, and that is why I have the differnt preference? I don't understand it??.

    on a similar note, I did read somewhere that the RS meter was lacking in reading lower Freq tones and needs to be adjusted, is that the reason for runnning the sub "hot"?
     
  10. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

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  11. rodneyH

    rodneyH Supporting Actor

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    Vince, thanks for your help, now I understand it, thank you for taking the time to type all of that. That really makes sense, especially since i never listen to stuff at reference level, so it may be even more important for someone like me.

    One point i don't understand, when you mention the volume control on my AMP and only being turned up 1/4 of the way, is that the wrong way to do it?, I understand that you are supposed to turn the pre-amp all the way DOWN and use the volume control on the amp (or is it the other way around, now I am confusing myself??). What is the proper way.

    I do undertstand what you are saying about headroom, and I seem to have plenty of it, but I am only in a medium sized room
     
  12. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

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  13. Brent_Sch

    Brent_Sch Stunt Coordinator

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    Vince,

    I'm talking about the Subwoofer Output Control only being set to -5. On the SVS site they recommend it being set 25% of the way up. In my case that is -5 (scale of -10 to +10). My PE plate amp volume control for the sub is only a little more than 1/4 the way up because any louder and it would be set way too hot for the rest of the speakers.

    So should I be happy with what I have or should I take down the Subwoofer Output Control to increase the amp volume for the sub?

    Also, I don't believe my receiver has the other LFE control that you or the SVS website talk of. It is a Kenwood VR505.

    Thanks for your help!
     
  14. rodneyH

    rodneyH Supporting Actor

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    thats my prob, at -10 it is still too load, thats why I have to back the amp down, I re-calib it since I wrote last time, I did it about 3 dB "hot" and it was still a little to much and backed it off to about 1-2 db "hot" (which is about 55-60% of full volume on the sub amp), it does sound a little bit better.
     
  15. Pete Mazz

    Pete Mazz Supporting Actor

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    On a lot of plate amps the level control IS a like a volume control. Vince is talking about higher end amps that have Gain controls, which as he said, are attenuators of the input signal.

    With those plate amps, you would be hard pressed to have the volume controls at max and not blow the driver. A setting of -5 on the receivers sub level sounds right to me, as it gives you some remote adjustability (word?).

    Pete
     
  16. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

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  17. BruceD

    BruceD Screenwriter

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    rodneyH,

    If I could offer a possible explanantion for what might be going on.

    When using the RS meter even with filtered pink noise, I find that a room's bass peaks (room modes that increase SPL levels at certain frequencies) can still cause the SPL meter's readings to be somewhat misleading.

    By this I mean the SPL meter can actually be registering some of these peaks and thus not quite an accurate picture for bass calibration.

    If your room has bass peaks (most do) and they are not reduced in some way (bass traps and/or parametric EQ) it may seem like the sub's bass is either too weak or too strong depending on what source material is being played (different bass frequencies).

    This is part of the hidden picture of an SPL meter and what it tells about level adjustment.

    I found a sub with the additon of a parametric EQ device to provide great gains in smoother and cleaner bass reproduction.
     
  18. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

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