Cabinet question

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Darrin_R, Feb 4, 2003.

  1. Darrin_R

    Darrin_R Stunt Coordinator

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    I have been considering a DIY sub for a long time. The only thing that has stopped me at this point is I really dont have the time it requires to make a quality cabinet. Can I get a good cabinet online ( and where ) or should I just wait until I have the time to build it.
     
  2. There are several cabinet makers that visit here

    In no particular order:

    Brian Bunge (RutledgeAudioDesign)
    John Janowitz (Stryke)
    Kyle Richardson (Acoustic Visions)
    Hank Frankenberg (HF Soundwerks (formerly 3M [​IMG]))

    there are others, but these are the more familiar names with people here.

    Parts Express also has some MDF flats in 2 sizes for subs.
     
  3. Hank Frankenberg

    Hank Frankenberg Cinematographer

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    Tony, you're so funny. Better change that co. name to:
    HF Soundwerks[​IMG]
     
  4. Darrin_R

    Darrin_R Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks for the reply

    I have seen the ones at parts express and stryke. I will look at the others.
     
  5. Andrus_R

    Andrus_R Stunt Coordinator

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    If time or the expertise are what's preventing you from building your own sub cabinet, I'd say do it without braces.

    If you build a small sealed buttjoint mdf panel construction with no braces, It shouldn't take you more than 15 minutes with 8 clamps.
     
  6. Why compromise a cabinets integrity by not bracing in an exchange for time or expertise? If you are going to invest in the parts, why skimp on such an easy thing. Bracing is really easy to do and takes no more "expertise" than building a shell.

    as for time, how long does it take to cut a 2x2?
     
  7. Darrin_R

    Darrin_R Stunt Coordinator

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    Skills are not the problem nor the tools.

    I dont think I would want to cut any corners (haha) when building the cabinet. I would want to brace it and have more of a furniture grade finish.

    If I build the cabinet I was going to cover the MDF in true 1" solid oak which I can get for $2.50 per board foot. I think I just talked myself into doing it myself.
     
  8. The problem with thick solid wood covering is that the woods likes to expand and contract and cup, and the MDF wants to remain completely fixed.

    If you want a solid wood finish, don't use a very thick solid piece (I like to stay under 1/2" and ideally at 1/4".
    Don't use a single piece to span wide areas. I like to use 4-5" sections joined together with alternating cupping for any spans.
    If possible, have the longer dimension in in the direction of the grain
     
  9. Darrin_R

    Darrin_R Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks Anthony. Thats good advice since I live a climate with very humid summers and dry winters.
     
  10. Darrin, since you have big humidity swings, I would HIGHLY recommend you NOT do any solid hardwood facing. I recommend that you instead use a combination of veneer and 1/4 round.

    below is an example of what I mean(with "fancy" legs):
    http://hometown.aol.com/ipoweret/PASub.html


    You can really spice things up by using two complimentary woods.
    CUT AND PASTE the following link to get an idea
    http://beyond_gomer.tripod.com/sub5.jpg
    this was my first sub, and while it does use a solid 3/4" face with 1/4" facing, it still can serve as an example of contrasting woods (maple and walnut here)..sorry for the poor resolution.


    Here is where you can get some NBL veneer (I definately think the cost difference over paper-backed is worth it)
    www.tape-ease.com
     
  11. Ronnie Ferrell

    Ronnie Ferrell Second Unit

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  12. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Producer

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    The NBL stuff is what I use whenever possible. Much nicer than the paperbacked stuff.
     
  13. Thanks for the correction.

    The biggest thing I like about NBL is how forgiving it is to surface imperfections. With paperback, any raise in the glue seam, or spec of sand under the veneer shows up. with NBL, you can high a lot more.


    edit: NBL also is very good at preventing bleedthrough when/if you oil the wood.
     
  14. Ronnie Ferrell

    Ronnie Ferrell Second Unit

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    I also like the sandability of NBL. I mean you can't go "hog wild" and use a belt sander or anything close to it. But you do have a bigger buffer for sanding than with paperback. I have not had a "sand through" with NBL yet!

    Ronnie
     
  15. John Wes

    John Wes Stunt Coordinator

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    A question?

    Let's say I try my hand at a sub cabinet..

    I've been thinking of a sealed tempest mid q type with mdf.

    But I love the look of finished hardwoods..I've done quite a bit of staining and finishing.

    but I've wondered on how they get a rounded wook look on the corners with out visible seams...

    Looks like NBL is the answer? How hard would it be to apply to an MDF cabinet with very noticable rounded corners? Or would it be easer to just use solid hardwood for the corners?
     
  16. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Producer

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    John,

    I use a 3/4" roundover bit to round the corners on cabinets and then wrap the NBL veneer around the cabinet. I like it much better than cabinets I've seen with hardwood inserts.
     
  17. Hank Frankenberg

    Hank Frankenberg Cinematographer

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    John, I've been building cabinets for a long time and I use a 3/4" radius roundover bit on most cabinets' front vertical edges. I start my veneer on one side, wrap it around the front rounded edge, across the front, around the other front edge, then the other side. I've always used paper-backed veneer with excellent results and no sand-throughs. I'll try the more expensive NBL stuff that Brian likes someday. You've already received the best advice from Tony: don't use solid wood.
    Have fun![​IMG]
     

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