Burn-in question

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Dave Gorman, Jul 23, 2002.

  1. Dave Gorman

    Dave Gorman Supporting Actor

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    I'm sure this has been discussed to death probably more than once... but a search did not reveal an answer for the specific question I have.

    I have a new Tosh 50H81. I realize that the vertical gray bars in "Normal" view can eventually burn in. My question is, do the horizontal black bars on 2.35:1 presentations present a burn-in threat?
     
  2. Joel Mack

    Joel Mack Cinematographer

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    They do if that's all you watch, and you don't have your set calibrated (or at least taken out of "torch" mode)...
     
  3. Brian Glaeske

    Brian Glaeske Stunt Coordinator

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    To be accurate, the "black" bars don't burn in, the frequently used phosphors wear more.

    Brian G.
     
  4. BruceSpielbauer

    BruceSpielbauer Second Unit

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    As the other replies indicated, the answer is a definite "yes." In fact, the black masking bands are more of a risk than the gray ones are.

    If you need a link to a thread on a forum which was begun by a user who discovered his burn-in, caused by the black masking bars about three days ago, let me know. He relaxed a bit too much. He titled his thread "Screen Burn In -- I Eat My Words!"

    -Bruce
     
  5. Dave Gorman

    Dave Gorman Supporting Actor

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  6. BruceSpielbauer

    BruceSpielbauer Second Unit

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    >>> That really sucks! I would miss out on a whole lot of movies not watching 2.35:1!! >>I don't suppose there is a hard science to this, but am I looking at weeks or years before the 2.35:1 burn sets in?
     
  7. Joel Mack

    Joel Mack Cinematographer

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  8. Jael

    Jael Agent

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    I have the Panny 47wx42 and I keep my picture (contrast) at around 17 (17/63), I then compensate a little bit with the brightness at 36 (36/63) as it is my understanding that the contrast is more of a risk than brightness. While this still maintains the bars as an unused portion it reduces the intensity of wear on the image area, in theory reducing the pace/potential of burn in.

    I spent the first few weeks not enjoying my set b/c I was trying to keep all my levels as was appropriate to avoid burn in. Some suggested 27 picture, 29 brightness, but this left me with a lot of image loss in the darks (let alone not coming close to those suggested from some calibration disks). I had to find settings that I could enjoy while still feeling that I was respecting the potential for burn in.

    As far as the duration till burn in for 15 hours of viewing. I think you'll be hard pressed to get a valid answer. There are other factors that play into the equation beyond your bars. Some seem to just be 'unlucky' and suffer burn more readily than others. Some play games for hours (for years) and never see a hint while others get burned in a few months of logo exposure. Whether this is a build quality issue, luck with good phosphors, less heat, etc., it still leaves you with no way to make a 'fully' informed decision. You have to decide what compromises you are willing to make (zooms, contrast, etc.) We could all eliminate our risks of burn in by dropping our contrast and brightness to zip, but hell, what's the point?

    The best advice is to do just what you're doing which is gather as much information as is available from multiple sources and make a decision based on your own risk-tolerance level. I've decided to find a point that I can enjoy while respecting the risks. I've found a point that I believe reduces my chance for burn in but gives me a truly satisfying image, leaving me fairly comfortable that I won't suffer burn. I turn down things when I'm watching the news but I watch my movies the way I'll enjoy them.

    I don't want to chop off part of my image when I'm watching a movie, so I don't. But I make that decision feeling relatively comfortable that I watch enough stretched material to reduce the uneven wear. All of this comes from the information I've gathered from people on this forum and other sites, aswell as my own limits of what I will compromise on. In the end it is 'your' set.

    The most important part is enjoying a good flic on a big, great looking screen and not 'feeling' compromised or cheated in the process...
     
  9. WilliamG

    WilliamG Supporting Actor

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    Well, this just really bites ... I also have the 50H81-have had for a little over a month; and with a bit of trepidation and a general guarded feeling, I watch TV. My wife and daughter love watching SoapNet on DirecTV, and I try and keep the brightness to a watchable minimum because I don't want that logo burnt in the corner. AND they love Animal Planet ... so there's THAT green logo that I have to watch out for. Finally, I love it for DVD's-and I mostly have the anamorphic 2.35:1 kind. I'm really getting paranoid and am starting to have buyer's remorse really bad, even though I know I can't return it now. I thought I was doing the right thing by getting this, even though I've read lots and LOTS of stuff here on the HTF. I just find myself worrying too much about it.
    Well, I just looked, and there's not a 'smilie' that looks like it's wringing it's hands-that's the way I feel.[​IMG] Don't misunderstand. I LOVE the set-it's the other stuff that's getting to me.
     
  10. Dave Marx

    Dave Marx Stunt Coordinator

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    William, I am in your shoes! I just forked over 2400 bucks for the new HDTV and I am also concerned about the burn-in factor. Bottom line: I think we just have to be aware of the potential problem and take the necessary precautions. To me that means, varying your viewing habits (not all XBOX games and no TV), making sure the contrast and brightness are not jacked up high, and making sure static images don't stay on the screen for hours and hours.

    Beyond that...what else can we do? Try not to worry and just enjoy your new TV. That is what I plan to do...
     
  11. WilliamG

    WilliamG Supporting Actor

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    Dave,
    Same here. At least I don't have to worry about the video game thing-yet. My daughter has had her PlayStation for several years and the novelty has worn out. Occasionally, she will ask to hook it up, but hasn't since we have the new set.
    I have my contrast to 30 and my brightness to 44. That seems to work best for me right now. I calibrated using VE just after delivery. I think it may be time for me to repeat the process now that we have clocked some major viewing time.
    Good luck!
    ... and Thanks!:b [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  12. Dave Marx

    Dave Marx Stunt Coordinator

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    William...what a coincidence. Those are just about my exact settings on my SONY 53" HDTV. The contrast does indeed look very good turned down...more natural, and less "harsh" on the eyes. Looks like a movie picture, doesn't it? However, the picture does tend to suffer if I turn the brightness down below 40% or so. So I have chosen to leave that around 40 or 42.

    Good luck!
     
  13. Michael Brunet

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    Would moving a 4:3 image around the screen for every hour of 4:3 material help reduce the possibility of screen burn-in?
    I watch a decent (maybe 10%) amount of 4:3 material on DVD (TV shows, older films), and I have a malata n996, which allows you to pan the DVD image anywhere you'd like on the screen. It seems to me that (since the TV I just ordered doesn't have a feature to slowly move 4:3 images around the screen) I could simply pan the image horizontally around my widescreen set, and that would cut down on the possibility of burn-in. Is this correct?

    Thanks,

    Mike
     

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