'Burn-in' on Widescreen RPTVs?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by JordyC, Aug 3, 2001.

  1. JordyC

    JordyC Auditioning

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    I am in the process of upgrading my home theatre - and am likely going to buy one of the (most likely)Toshiba, Panasonic or Mitsubishi Widescreen TVs....
    As well as watching widescreen DVDs - and hopefully HDTV when it comes around, I intend to watch (not much) cable TV - and more importantly - 4:3 DVDs - I am a big fan/collector of older film - plus I can think of a few others - concert films...home movies...
    Now - for broadcast- I'd probably have no problem using one of the modes that mattes the top and bottom of the screen...but for a film - say The Third Man or Battleship Potemkin, to think of two examples where the full frame ratio is most important - I would have to use it in 4:3 mode...
    My question - how likely/common is 4:3 burn-in on Widescreen TVs - particularly the various Toshiba Theaterwide models.....
    Also - while I'm at it - best 5.1 speaker system for under 2 grand Canadian?
    JLC
     
  2. JiM T

    JiM T Stunt Coordinator

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    I have the same question, Jordy. I just ordered the new Panny 47" from Sears, but the burn-in factor seems kind of scary to me. I also cannot imagine "blowing-up" older, classic films like the ones you mentioned to fit the 16x9 frame. Are we in trouble? Or is it okay as long as we don't watch 4X3 material "all the time"? (How often IS okay, anyway??) I'll be watching 16x9 DVDs most of the time, but I have to bow to a movie's OAR when it comes to old ones.
    Thanks,
    JiM T
     
  3. Dennis Kindig

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    The new Toshiba's now have what they call "Orbital Motion". This moves the screen image in very slight increments so that it doesn't sit in one location for an extended lenght of time.
    Dennis
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  4. Howard_A

    Howard_A Stunt Coordinator

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    I watch 4x3 material in the letterbox mode. Yes, it bothers me that the image is cropped and stretched but I don't want burn-in on my Toshiba.
     
  5. Craig Robertson

    Craig Robertson Supporting Actor

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    with a properly calibrated set you should not have a problem with burn in on your crt's.
     
  6. John-D

    John-D Stunt Coordinator

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    Burn-ins are caused by excessive contrast and static images for extended periods of time.
    Properly set, you MINIMIZE the chances of burn-ins in CRT based RPTV's.
    What remains is the usage wear of the CRT's that is evident if you view 4:3 images on a 16:9 display with bars on both sides.
    Those more interested in saving their CRT's tolerate stretched modes. Others just enjoy their purchase.
    If you maintain safe contrast levels and switch regularly between 4:3 and 16:9 you may not have any problems afterall.
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    The things we own end up owning us
     
  7. Matt_Stevens

    Matt_Stevens Supporting Actor

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    I talked with a couple people who say you are going to do yourself a favor if you only watch widescreen material on a widescreen set for the first 100 to 120 hours, as the CRT's are breaking in. After that, according to these guys, as long as you are properly calibrated and not viewing 4:3 material more than 50% of the time, you have nothing to worry about.
    True?
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    www.deceptions.net/superman
     
  8. JordyC

    JordyC Auditioning

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    Thanks for the info.....
    Do I decrease or increase the chance of burn-in with Direct View sets...the Samsung or Toshiba models for example? (pardon me if I am not as knowledgable as most of you)
    As I've been shopping around, I've come to realize that I can get an excellent deal on either the Toshiba or Samsung widescreen sets and as well, that I prefer - for my smaller living space - a direct view TV. I had intended originally on an RPTV because it seemed to offer the best value.
    In terms of stretched modes for 4:3...I hardly watch broadcast television, I would stretch/matte/zoom CNN or any programming that the picture is not the issue...though I don't think I would tolerate stretching, etc for programs such as the Simpsons, or particularly for films made before 1950....it would be the equivalent of pan and scan for the academy ratio. Anyone who feels that OAR is important for widescreen should feel the same way for Citizen Kane.
    JLC
     
  9. Howard_A

    Howard_A Stunt Coordinator

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    I agree with you that OAR is important. I just don't treat broadcast TV (including The Simpsons) with the same reverence as I do with films. I would certainly switch to 1.33:1 for "Casablanca" but I'll tolerate full frame -> widescreen cropping for CNN.
    [Edited last by Howard_A on August 05, 2001 at 05:24 PM]
     
  10. Cameron Seaman

    Cameron Seaman Supporting Actor

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  11. Phil Iturralde

    Phil Iturralde Screenwriter

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  12. Cameron Seaman

    Cameron Seaman Supporting Actor

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  13. Jeff Leigh

    Jeff Leigh Agent

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    Why is burn-in more prevalent on RPTVs than on computer monitors?
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  14. Paul W

    Paul W Second Unit

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    CRTs for projection are much brighter than direct view CRTs. I think that accounts for 90% of the difference.
    [​IMG]
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    [​IMG] Paul Warren
    Hey fella . . . I bet you're still livin' in your parent's cellar . . . downloading pictures of Sarah Michelle Gellar . . . and posting "Me too!" like some brain-dead AOL-er . . . I should do the world a favor and cap ya' like Old Yeller . . . you're just about as useless as MPEGs [sic] to Hellen Keller.
     

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