Building speaker wires into basement - subwoofer cable too?

Discussion in 'Accessories, Cables, and Remotes' started by Eric Wadsworth, Nov 1, 2005.

  1. Eric Wadsworth

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    Hi all,

    I'm building my basement, and I want to put in a ceiling-recessed pulldown projector screen, and ceiling-recessed speakers. I bought some speaker-wire (14 gauge), and a two panels with 4 pairs of binding posts each. These panels mount on a standard electrical outlet box. I'll have seven speakers mounted in the ceiling, and the wires will go to these two panels near where the receiver will sit on a shelf.

    But what about the subwoofer? It will be self amplified, I understand, so I can't use the 8th set of binding posts for it. I'm supposed to connect it to the receiver directly via a well-sheilded cable fitted with RCA plugs on either end, right? But the subwoofer is going to be put into a box under a window-seat behind the screen, and the receiver will go on a shelf near the ceilind on the right side of the seating area. It's kind of far away. I was also wanting to build all the speaker wiring into the walls, including the wire for the subwoofer. Having a hole in the wall with a wire sticking out is so lame, but what other options do I have?

    This will be my first surround-sound anything, so I'm rather a newby at this. I'll post my proposed system in another thread in a different forum for comments and feedback.

    Thanks!

    // /- [)
     
  2. chris_everett

    chris_everett Second Unit

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    I've seen wall plates with RCA connectors on them. I believe I've even seen them at Lowe's. Any of them should work fine. Although the cable manufactures will tell you otherwise, subwoofer cable is nothing special, and no special care needs to be taken with it.
     
  3. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    Make sure the wire you use is specifically rated for in-wall low voltage use. Just any speaker wire's not going to cut it. You can install a wall plate for an RCA hookup it's no problem. Have you considered an Infinite Baffle configuration for your subwoofer? A custom basement starting from the ground up is the ideal situation for installing one. If you have a little DIY knowhow you can get much better bass than any box or tube sub can offer for probably less money, and it will look really custom and nice. Join the Cult of the Infinitely Baffled!
     
  4. Eric Wadsworth

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    Okay, well, if it's regular RCA, then there's no problem then. I just need to make sure to get something rated for low voltage (well insulated), right?

    I'll just put an RCA wall plate in there then. Sweet!

    As for the infinitely baffled, I need to read more about that. Sounds interesting, anyway. [​IMG]
     
  5. James Edward

    James Edward Supporting Actor

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    What you want to run for the sub is regular old RG-6 cable. They are virtually all rated for in-wall application, and are very well shielded. Just use an F-RCA adapter at the receiver end for the sub-out jack, and another at the sub end of things. You can make it very neat by putting a wall plate with a coaxial(F) connector near the sub, then run a short length of wire to the sub.

    We use this setup all the time when running long lengths, or through walls, etc.
     
  6. Eric Wadsworth

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    Okay, this is great information. I'm a little confused... a female coaxial connector near the sub? Don't I need a female RCA jack there, for the sub to connect to? What's the coaxial for?

    Just to be clear, here's how it works in my mind:

    1. Subwoofer sits in it's spot, with a sahort cable connecting it to the female RCA jack mounted on a wall plate. (What is this cable like? Is it RG-6 cable with two male RCA plugs?)

    2. Behind the wall plate, RG-6 cable runs through the wall, to where the receiver lives, ending in an identical wall plate with a female RCA jack.

    3. A cable identical to the cable in step 1 connects the wall jack to the receiver.

    Is this correct?
     
  7. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    The cable in step 3 is any old audio cable. Look for wall jack hardware at www.partsexpress.com. An IB would be much better.
     
  8. Eric Wadsworth

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    Ah, IB is Infinitely Baffled! Cool. I'm going to have to read up on this.
     
  9. Eric Wadsworth

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    Okay, I just finally figured out what James Edward was saying, once I realized that RG-6 is coaxial cable. I had a 35' RG-6 made at Radio Shack, with gold connectors. That, along with the two gold RCA adapters, cost a total of $20.00 even. Nice!

    I wanted gold because it was going in the wall, didn't want any corrosion possibilities.

    Thanks so much!
     

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