Building a 6" riser?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Dean DeMass, Aug 19, 2001.

  1. Dean DeMass

    Dean DeMass Screenwriter

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    I am hoping that you folks can give me a few pointers on building a riser for my theater. My wife and I decided to re-arrange our theater room so we could have two rows of seating. The front row is a recliner loveseat that will stay on the floor. I have placed my couch behind and I want it on 6" high riser. I want to make it 95" long and 55" deep. Is there any specific wood I should use? Are there any websites I can go to that have rough plans for this? Also, the riser will sit on the current floor, it will not be permantly attached to it.
    Thanks for the help!!!
    -Dean-
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    My HT Equipment
    "I've seen you and you are not cool."
     
  2. RAF

    RAF Lead Actor

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    Dean,
    If you go to my HT website you will see something similar I did with 3/4" plywood and some 2x4's. My construction was very simple and similar to what you propose to do. I took a full sheet (8'x4') of 3/4" plywood and framed it with 2x4's (as well as cutting some of the 2x4's for cross members underneath.) The resulting height of the finished carpeted riser which has the theater seats bolted to it and sits freely on the floor, is approximately 5+ inches. (3/4" for the plywood, 4" for the 2x4's, and 1/4"+ for the carpetting).
    It is very sturdy (and surprisingly heavy) but can be, if I wish, moved around to accommodate HT revisions, etc.
    You noted you wanted to make your riser 95" x 55" x 6"
    The 8 foot length of a single sheet of strong plywood is close to what you want, but the 55" depth would require piecing together additional material to achieve the additional 7" beyond 4 feet. And the additional 1" of height could be obtained by using wider framing materials.
    For my purposes, I found the 96" x 48" x 5" to be ideal and I was able to use off the shelf items rather than piecing things together for a very cost effective solution. Since I was attaching actual theater seats to the riser I didn't need more than 48"'s of depth and it works perfectly. Of course, if your measurements are based on limitations imposed by your particular HT needs, then you can always customize the size of the riser.
    Hope some of this helps rather than confuses the picture.
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    RAF
    [Demented Video Dude since 1997]
    [Computer Maven since 1956]
    ["PITA" since 1942]
    My HT (latest update 02/05/01)
     
  3. Dean DeMass

    Dean DeMass Screenwriter

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    Robert,
    Thanks for the help!!! I remeasured and I would be able to go 48" instead of 55". I just won't have the riser flush against the wall, which is no big deal. I am off to check out your site now. It has been awhile since I visited it and I should of remembered your site before posting. [​IMG]
    -Dean-
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    My HT Equipment
    "I've seen you and you are not cool."
     
  4. ace peterson

    ace peterson Second Unit

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    There was a place I saw on the net a while back that had a pretty decent picture of a good riser. I found it while searching for the Clark Synthesis transducers. It was on a page by consumer-direct or smart-home or something. But anyways, if you search for the transducer, you're bound to come across the plans. But, it is basically the same as RAF said, except I think they used 2x6's instead of 2x4's.
    Oh, and RAF... 2x4's are 3&1/2" high *nudge* *wink* not 4". Hey, someone has to give you a bad time...
    Ace
     
  5. RAF

    RAF Lead Actor

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  6. Robert Ma

    Robert Ma Second Unit

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    I went with 2x6 and 1/4" plywood but if I was doing it again I would use 3/4" plywood.
    I made a box frame first, then I ran the 2x6 planks long ways as you can see here: http://users.erols.com/rmahle/theate...es/4floor1.htm
    Then I covered it with plywood and carpeted it: http://users.erols.com/rmahle/theate...es/4floor2.htm
    and http://users.erols.com/rmahle/theate...es/4floor3.htm
    The planks are about 14"s apart (better than code) but because I used 1/4" plywood it still swayed more than I liked.
    So, I flipped it over and reinforced the frame more with small 2x6 cuts the went the opposite direction. I put about 4 per plank area somewhere around 15"s apart. This would not have been needed if I only bought 3/4" plywood.
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    Goto www.erols.com/rmahle to see my theater
     
  7. Wes

    Wes Screenwriter

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    Location:
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    Wes Peterson
    Dean, On my Construction pages 2 thru 5 you can see the building of my 14'x10'x8" riser. I wanted a riser that felt like part of the room construction so that's what I set out to build.
    prosteering.8k.com
    I used 2x8 on 12" centers and 3/4" plywood. I did not use any type of insulation so I hope it will not come back to bite me in the form of sound resonance or something. I glued and nailed the 2x8s but glued and screwed the 3/4 plywood down.
    Wes
    [Edited last by Wes on August 21, 2001 at 12:08 AM]
    [Edited last by Wes on August 21, 2001 at 12:09 AM]
     

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