Brightness problems over S-Video

Discussion in 'Playback Devices' started by John_Berger, Oct 6, 2003.

  1. John_Berger

    John_Berger Cinematographer

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    I did a search, but most of the issues that came up dealt with S-Video vs. component. This one, however, is with S-Video vs. composite.

    A friend of mine e-mailed this to me, but I don't have an answer.

     
  2. ChuckSolo

    ChuckSolo Screenwriter

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    What kind of TV do you have? On my 36" Panasonic, I can set the individual "video" modes independently, that is, brightness, contrast, sharpness, etc. for component, video2 (S-Video), video3, ect. That way, I can adjust the picture on the input for the VCR, DVD player and TV independently. This might be the issue with your TV. Adjust the settings for the DVD player and it shouldn't affect the other modes.
     
  3. John_Berger

    John_Berger Cinematographer

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    I asked him this question initially, and he's pretty sure that he doesn't have independent adjustments between input modes.

    He's aware of this thread, but he's waiting for his account to be approved at which point he will be able to answer any other questions, but he admitted to be that he's using a $15 cable. [​IMG]
     
  4. Bill Will

    Bill Will Screenwriter

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    It maybe just a "Quirk" of his tv set. Has he tried using an S-Video cable vs Composite Cable with something else besides his DVD Player? I had an older TV that did this, but I can't remember what brand it was, but I would use something else with an S-Video Output to check the tv & use the DVD Player on another tv to check the DVD Player before I spent a bunch of money on more expensive cables. It could be just a "Quirk" on either one on them.
     
  5. videobruce

    videobruce Stunt Coordinator

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    The cables shouldn't matter unless the distance is over 12 or 15'

    Either the composite output is high and the Y/C low of the recorder (or the reverse)

    or.......

    The composite input sensistivity is low and the Y/C is high on the monitor (or the reverse).

    In other words level differences. Consumer equipment is never known for being properly adjusted.

    Is there THAT much of a difference?

    Do you have another monitor to compare or another Y/C source (another recorder or DVD player)?
     
  6. Lew Crippen

    Lew Crippen Executive Producer

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    Since S-Video breaks the video signal into two components (color and brightness) this actually might make sense. If the luminance portion is defective anywhere in the chain, including but not nearly limited to the cable, you could have a problem that would effect brightness. For example this could be a simple as a faulty S-Video input in the TV where the problem is limited to the luminance portion of the signal.

    In a composite signal all of the information is contained in a single signal.
     
  7. videobruce

    videobruce Stunt Coordinator

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    If just the Y level was low, the chroma would be very saturated.

    The easiest way would be get the service manual and look for the level adjustment for the Y/C output and increase that.
    Only problem is you would need a scope or WFM( Wave Form Monitor) w/ Y/C inputs which isn't something you would have access to.
     

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