Bridged Amps vs Non Bridged: Any difference???

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Kevin. W, Aug 24, 2001.

  1. Kevin. W

    Kevin. W Screenwriter

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    I was wondering if anyone could tell me if there is any difference between Bridging and AMP(eg 6x60 to 3x150) or a straight 3x150? Reason I ask is I am now looking at the Rotel RMB 1066 to be used as a 3 channel AMP since it can be had for less than a 3 channel AMP non bridged. Here is a link to the AMP.
    Kevin
    http://www.rotel.com/products/rmb1066.htm
     
  2. Phil A

    Phil A Producer

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    The main thing to watch for with any bridged amps is that they are generally not recommended for low impedence loads. So if your speakers are a hard load to drive, I would carefully look at the capabilities of the amp. Many manuf. like to see they drive 8-ohm speakers only.
     
  3. Drew Eckhardt

    Drew Eckhardt Stunt Coordinator

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    In a bridged configuration, the amplifier sees half the impedance.
    If "8 ohms" meant 8 ohms every where, the amplifier would never see a load below 4 ohms and should be fine. In practice, impedance varies with frequency. For example, my "8 ohm compatable" speakers have a minimum impedance of 3.2 ohms. Most amplifiers would be most unhappy trying to drive the 1.6 ohms you get when you divide by two.
     
  4. Kevin. W

    Kevin. W Screenwriter

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    Speakers are Paradigm Mini Monitors, CC-350. WOuld these be a problem?
    Kevin
     
  5. Kevin C Brown

    Kevin C Brown Producer

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    The issue with the amp "seeing" 1/2 the impedance at the speakers, is that it doubles the current that the amp must output. If the current draw is too high, and the output stage of the amp isn't rated high enough, poof! There goes the output stage. You have a very nice looking, heavy, paper weight.
    Can happen with low impedance speakers, and inefficient ones too. Remember that an "8 ohm" speaker isn't necessarily 8 ohms across the entire frequency range.
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