Box Office - Does it matter to you?

Discussion in 'Movies' started by DouglasRobert, Mar 8, 2004.

  1. DouglasRobert

    DouglasRobert Second Unit

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    It just seems that as I get older, the amount a movie takes in at the box office does not matter, nor does it influence me that much to see the movie or not. I am now more interested in seeing only movies that I am interested in and not seeing it just because every one else is.

    I remember when I was younger I would go with the flow and see what every one else was, but not now.

    Is this true for you as well?
     
  2. Eric Peterson

    Eric Peterson Cinematographer

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    I don't ever remember Box Office influencing me. I used to see more popular movies but never because of the Box-Office.
     
  3. Malcolm R

    Malcolm R Executive Producer

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    I've never been influenced by "the crowd" or box office numbers and it's sad that so many people are. Usually, the most-deserving films fail to find big numbers at the box office anyway, so if you're just going to see whatever's #1 on any given weekend generally you're seeing a lot of mindless drivel.
     
  4. BobV

    BobV Second Unit

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    I'm not influenced by BO numbers either, but I sure do enjoy tracking them [​IMG] .
     
  5. Phil Carter

    Phil Carter Second Unit

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    Box office take doesn't influence me to see a film -- I make up my own mind about that -- but I do follow box office takes because I like to see the movies that I enjoy doing well.

    Return of the King is a good example. I've been following its progress as it overtakes film after film on the all-time list, particularly as it passed films that I didn't feel deserved their large haul.

    That said, I think the people at Box Office Mojo have too much time on their hands. [​IMG]

    cheers,
    Phil
     
  6. Jason Seaver

    Jason Seaver Lead Actor

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    I pay attention just to have a certain idea of how long I can procrastinate before a film leaves theaters (I've seen a lot of movies at the Thursday 9pm show), especially since I'm mostly using AMC's discount tickets that aren't good until a movie's second Monday in release; if it's a flop, that gives me only four days to see it for $6 as opposed to $10, assuming a minimum two-week release.

    Otherwise, it's a matter of curiosity - if such-and-such movie does well, there will probably be more like it made. So I fear the potential glut of sword-and-sorcery movies LOTR may inspire, grumble about the sci-fi/action movies which all look like The Matrix, etc. It affects what movies I'll be able to see in a year's time; no amount of other people spending their money is going to get me into 50 First Dates.
     
  7. Rob Bartlett

    Rob Bartlett Stunt Coordinator

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    I doesn't affect whether I will see a movie or not, reviews, or interest in the actors, directors or subject matter do. I see any movie as soon as it is available, so it's box-office is a moot point anyways.

    However, I do like to track them, and talk about them on my blog. It's a great way to judge the politics of he business and the pyschology of the culture. I also like to use it as a club to beat on what I feel are overrated "talents" whose commercal appeal, or lack therof fails to warrant their ubiquity.
     
  8. Chris

    Chris Lead Actor

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    It has never affected whether I enjoy a film. It has, on the other hand, been used by me (and others) to feel somewhat vindicated at times [​IMG]
     
  9. Robert Ringwald

    Robert Ringwald Cinematographer

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    I also think it's interesting to follow them. For example, Passion of the christ is making a killing, which I think it slightly interesting considering many thought it wouldn't make more than 30 million total. It's rising so fast, I think it's kind of fun to see how easily it's going to climb.
     
  10. Carlo Medina

    Carlo Medina Executive Producer

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    Box Office only interests me in the sense that I wish that good films (IMO) do well, simply to give the creative talent on that film a chance to make more films. Hollywood is notorious for one-and-done mentality, unless you're an established name.

    But as far as enjoyment, two of my favorite films in the last decade - Shawshank Redemption and Dark City - did very poorly in the Box Office, and one of my least favorites - Ep1 The Phantom Menace - grossed half a billion domestically. So no, BO doesn't mean a lick to me wrt to whether I will see/enjoy a film.
     
  11. Seth--L

    Seth--L Screenwriter

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    What I don't get about box office gross is why people obsess about it. The film industry is the only industry that measures success by gross instead of number of units sold (ticket sales in this case). It drives me nuts when in books and essays writers not only use gross as a measure of success and popularity, but they don't even bother to adjust for inflation.
     
  12. Alex Spindler

    Alex Spindler Producer

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    My sentiment exactly. I am heartened when the little movie I really enjoy finds an audience because it gives me hope that both the filmmakers can bring their next vision to the screen and that someone in Hollywood will take note of the success of the movie in their next decision.
     
  13. ChrisBEA

    ChrisBEA Screenwriter

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    Box office has never influenced my movie-going. Of course, I like it when I see a film I really enjoyed do well, especially when it is an off-the-radar type of film. I remember the excitement of seeing Memento crack the top 10 a couple of times. One thing I do wish, as mentioned before, I wish we got tickets sold counts as opposed to box-office. If the tickets are there, the box-office will come and it would be more easily relatable for comparing films from different eras.
     
  14. david stark

    david stark Second Unit

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    It looks like I'm going against the grain here, but I do occasionally see films based on box office figures. I make most decisions on what films to see on trailers (do I like that genre of film), film reviews from various sources and recommendations from friends. Very occasionally though I have written a film off my 'to see' list and if it gets big box office numbers for a few weeks I may well go back and reconsider.
     
  15. Andy Sheets

    Andy Sheets Cinematographer

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    Yeah, I've gotten in the habit of doing that after a few movies I wanted to see got booted from theaters because I delayed too long in seeing them.

    The other reason box office numbers are interesting to me is that it gives an indication of what a filmmaker might be doing next. If a movie does well, it largely guarantees that the director will be able to make certain projects that he wouldn't otherwise have access to, which is why you see some directors alternate between "safe" hits and more personal works.
     
  16. Shawn_KE

    Shawn_KE Screenwriter

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    I never take the box office into consideration.

    Britney Spears and NSync sell tons of albums, but that doesnt mean their music is good or bad. (but yea, their bad [​IMG] )
     
  17. Paul_Sjordal

    Paul_Sjordal Supporting Actor

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    I also find that as I get older, the box office numbers have less and less influence on me, however I've made the opposite journey. When I was younger, I tended to avoid really popular movies and tended to go after more obscure movies. Big box office numbers were likely to drive me away.

    These days I'm more likely to base my decision on a combination of reviews, word of mouth from my friends, my own opinions of any filmmakers involved in the project, etc., but not necessarily box office.
     
  18. Scott Weinberg

    Scott Weinberg Lead Actor

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    I find box office reports fascinating, just like I find baseball statistics a lot of fun to read through.

    But no, they do not affect my moviegoing plans or my opinions in any way.
     
  19. Vickie_M

    Vickie_M Producer

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    Like many others here, I never base my movie-going on box office numbers, since many of my favorite films do poorly at the box office. Out of curiousity I did something I've never done before, which is look up the box office of some older favorite films.

    Brazil - $9,929,135
    Bliss - $660,537
    Birdy - $246,624 (don't know why all my favorites start with a "B")
    Local Hero - $5,895,761
    Return To Oz - $11,137,801
    The Stunt Man - $7,063,886
    One From The Heart - $900,000
    Never Cry Wolf - $29,600,000
    Blade Runner - $27,580,111
    A Clockwork Orange - $26,589,355

    Some movies made so little they weren't even tracked. I couldn't find War Hunt, Louie Bluie or Fitzcarraldo numbers on a cursory search. It's a bit depressing.

    Sometimes, other people discover my favorites and, obviously not knowing that I like them too (which, as seen above, is usually the kiss of death), go see them in large numbers, hence Star Wars, The Matrix and the Lord of the Rings films. Moulin Rouge! didn't do so badly at $57,386,607.

    Like everyone else, I like to see a film I love do well, just knowing that others are seeing the movie, and giving the filmmakers more leeway for their next project.

    I only started paying attention to box office numbers when Titanic came out. I'll bet that's true for a lot of people. As each week went by I got more and more obsessive about finding and marveling over the numbers. It wasn't a favorite film, but I really liked it, and was happy to see it do well after all the pre-release crap it took in the press. Each week's total was like a satisfying slap in the face to all the naysayers.
     
  20. Scott Weinberg

    Scott Weinberg Lead Actor

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    Oooh that's a fun idea, Vickie! Lemme try!

    Trainspotting - $16,491,080
    Legend - $15,502,112
    Dark City - $14,378,331
    Dragonslayer - $14,110,013
    Frailty - $13,110,448
    Office Space - $10,827,810
    The Man with Two Brains - $10,353,438
    Fearless - $6,995,302
    Highlander - $5,900,000
    Ed Wood - $5,869,802
    Eight Men Out - $5,680,515
    King of New York - $2,554,476
    Ravenous - $2,062,405
    Bad Lieutenant - $2,000,022
    State of Grace - $1,911,542
    Equilibrium - $1,203,794
    Below - $605,562
    Session 9 - $219,257
    May - $150,277 [​IMG]
     

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