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Bose virtually invisible 191 9 Pin DIN (1 Viewer)

SandyPaul

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Hello All

I moved to a home where there are 5 speakers installed in the theater room and all speakers are converging their wiring to a single wall outlet with two 9 pin connection exposed. My question is how do I connect to these speakers to my Yamaha TSR7850 receiver

Any help is greatly appreciated.

Sandy
 

SandyPaul

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JohnRice

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Some kind of proprietary wiring system. No telling how that’s wired. I suspect some disassembly and testing will be needed.
 

Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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Since you don’t have the wiring harness that connects to the wall plate connectors, your only option is to remove the plate and cut the speaker wires off the backside of the connectors. You will have to splice in extensions in order to make the in-wall wiring long enough to reach your Yamaha.

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Wayne A. Pflughaupt
 

SandyPaul

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Thank You Wayne. here is what it looks upon wall plate removal. Posting some pictures from different angles if you can help which wires is which.
 

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Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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Well, nothing I see there adds up. If there are five speakers in the HT room, there should be ten connection points (each speaker has a [+] and [-] connection). Yet, the pictures show 24 connections. Which ultimately get “dumped down” to only 18 connections (the two 9-pin connectors). So there’s more going on here than just speaker connections.

It might be helpful to contact Bose and see if they can get you some kind of installation manual, but ultimately you’re probably going to have to get professional on site to sort this out. This kind of thing requires someone to crawl through attics following cables, attaching tone-generating equipment to the wires to see which speaker makes sound, etc. It can’t be done via the web.

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Wayne A. Pflughaupt
 

JohnRice

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Well, nothing I see there adds up. If there are five speakers in the HT room, there should be ten connection points (each speaker has a [+] and [-] connection). Yet, the pictures show 24 connections. Which ultimately get “dumped down” to only 18 connections (the two 9-pin connectors). So there’s more going on here than just speaker connections.

It might be helpful to contact Bose and see if they can get you some kind of installation manual, but ultimately you’re probably going to have to get professional on site to sort this out. This kind of thing requires someone to crawl through attics following cables, attaching tone-generating equipment to the wires to see which speaker makes sound, etc. It can’t be done via the web.

Regards,
Wayne A. Pflughaupt
Wayne, you might notice there are un-insulated wires in there. Just bare, braided wires going to every fourth connection, it looks like to me. Do you have any idea what those are for?
 

Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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It’s what’s known as a drain wire, typically found in shielded cable used for installations (which would be anything that’s run in-wall or -ceiling). With installation-grade audio cable, the shield is not the braided or spiraled copper wrap we find with regular RCA cables, but a foil wrap, which you can see in the picture below as the blue extending below the gray outer jacket. (The second picture shows a two-conductor installation-grade cable with the foil unwapped but still intact.) Since the drain wire has no insulation, it has contact (and thus continuity) with the foil shield. Its purpose is to allow termination of the shield for an audio connection, which is typical for both balanced and unbalanced signals.

Which is another strange thing here, typically shielded cable is used for signal level, not speaker connections. But, it could be used for speaker-level, if the gauge is substantial enough. The wire in the pictures does look like a heavier gauge than the 22-24 AWG typically used for signal cable.

The other strange thing (as we didn’t have enough of that already) is the presence of multiple drain wires. This suggests that the cable is internally carrying maybe three or four individual signal pairs, each with its own foil wrap and drain wire.


9c56ba1b-3bf0-4285-b7a9-def8443b733a-jpeg.83719



foil-shield-reduced-jpg.82065

Regards,
Wayne A. Pflughaupt
 

SandyPaul

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It’s what’s known as a drain wire, typically found in shielded cable used for installations (which would be anything that’s run in-wall or -ceiling). With installation-grade audio cable, the shield is not the braided or spiraled copper wrap we find with regular RCA cables, but a foil wrap, which you can see in the picture below as the blue extending below the gray outer jacket. (The second picture shows a two-conductor installation-grade cable with the foil unwapped but still intact.) Since the drain wire has no insulation, it has contact (and thus continuity) with the foil shield. Its purpose is to allow termination of the shield for an audio connection, which is typical for both balanced and unbalanced signals.

Which is another strange thing here, typically shielded cable is used for signal level, not speaker connections. But, it could be used for speaker-level, if the gauge is substantial enough. The wire in the pictures does look like a heavier gauge than the 22-24 AWG typically used for signal cable.

The other strange thing (as we didn’t have enough of that already) is the presence of multiple drain wires. This suggests that the cable is internally carrying maybe three or four individual signal pairs, each with its own foil wrap and drain wire.


9c56ba1b-3bf0-4285-b7a9-def8443b733a-jpeg.83719



foil-shield-reduced-jpg.82065

Regards,
Wayne A. Pflughaupt
Thank You Wayne. Much appreciated.
 

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