Bose Acoustimass - 4 or 8 ohm?

Discussion in 'Speakers' started by Patrick.C, Jul 7, 2004.

  1. Patrick.C

    Patrick.C Second Unit

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    First a disclaimer - I'm a total newbie to the home theater hobby, but I know better than to buy Bose. I own an Acoustimass 6 simply because my wife won the speaker battle after seeing them demo'ed at a Bose store. (She likes their appearance more than anything). She agreed to stay out of the components and tv if we bought the Bose, so...

    I picked up the speakers back in January when I found a good deal on them. They sat in the box until last week when I picked up a new receiver (Onkyo 601). No problems thus far, but I ran into something regarding the ohm rating of the speakers that I wanted to ask the group here about. Two people (one a knowledgeable salesperson and the other a friend) have told me that Bose Acoustimass speakers are 4 ohm. Being that my new Onkyo can only push 6 to 8, I started looking through the Bose manual to see if they were correct. Every spec sheet that I've come across lists them as "compatible with receivers rated at 4 to 8 ohms" instead of the standard "this is an 8 ohm speaker". So I called Bose. The guy on the other end of the line had to put me on hold for 5 minutes to go check and when he came back on, apologized for the delay and said that he "had to make sure he had all of his ducks in a row" (for something as simple as an ohm rating?!?). He said that they are indeed an 8 ohm speaker and not to worry about hooking them up to my Onkyo.

    I can't help being suspicious here. For one, why the funny "compatible with, etc." instead of a standard ohm rating? And why did it take the guy so long to find out? Anyone know what the deal is here?
     
  2. ClintS

    ClintS Stunt Coordinator

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    I always have set my receiver to the 8 ohm setting for Bose speakers, it says to in the owners manual. I no longer have mine, I upgraded to cheaper conventional speakers. Dont worry about the purchase they are okay speakers just severly overpriced for what you get. If you havent already considered it, think about getting a true LFE subwoofer with a dedicated amplifier. The Bose bass module only goes down to about 80 Mhz and a good seperate sub will get you down to 20. You can hide the sub in a corner or behind a chair and it will really fill out the sound and give you that extra punch.
     
  3. MikeH1

    MikeH1 Screenwriter

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    Because Bose is the master of misleading marketing. Thats the ONLY thing this company does well. And oh yeah, they try to hide their specs.
     
  4. BrianWoerndle

    BrianWoerndle Supporting Actor

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    First, there is nothing wrong with "compatiable with 4-8 ohms). Speakers do not run at an exact ohm rating. It will continously vary with frequency and load. So even if the speaker syas 8 ohms, it will most likely dip down lower than that at times.

    The Bose speakers generally average around 6 ohms. They will be fine with your receiver.
     
  5. StephenHa

    StephenHa Second Unit

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    the am series are going to present about a 10 ohm load at the receiver (as tested at the speaker leads) there is a "fuse" setup in the bass module that adds a bit (from what I've been playing around with)
     
  6. Kenneth Harden

    Kenneth Harden Screenwriter

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    Well, I have been playing with the 6 system at work, and reguardless of their impedance, they seem to be VERY inefficent compared to other stuff.

    As much as I hate to admit it, if I was doing a home theater for a small walk-in closet, the system would be just great [​IMG]
     

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