Books You've Read 2017

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by DaveF, Mar 20, 2017.

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  1. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
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  2. Josh Steinberg

    Josh Steinberg Lead Actor
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    I got that audiobook as a gift for my wife and she loved it. Another recommendation towards that as well.

    In January, I read the Rogue One prequel novel Catalyst and it really enhanced my enjoyment of the film.

    I also read Mark Frost's "Secret History Of Twin Peaks" novel and enjoyed that a lot.

    Unfortunately, I've spent too much free time watching movies and not enough reading since then!
     
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  3. ponset

    ponset Second Unit

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    Finished reading the Super-Exciting sequel to DOC SAVAGE: THE SINISTER SHADOW, "The Empire of Doom".
    Both books are outstanding, 'A'

    Once again Doc Savage, The Shadow, and some of their Agents join forces
    to battle the forces of evil in NYC and in China during 1941

    http://www.radioarchives.com/Doc_Savage_Empire_Of_Doom_p/ap099.htm
     
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  4. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
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  5. Adam Lenhardt

    Adam Lenhardt Executive Producer

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    I've only read two books so far, both continuations of existing series. Peak television continues to take its tool on my reading and moviegoing habits.
    1. The Last of August by Brittany Cavallaro, the middle book in the Charlotte Holmes trilogy. Strongly mixed feelings on this one, as its not much of a traditional mystery. On the other hand, it delves deep into its characters and goes to some really dark, unsettling places. I still haven't encountered anything like these books, and I'll devour the third and final book as soon as it comes out.

    2. A Conjuring of Light by V. E. Schwab, the concluding chapter of the Shades of Magic trilogy -- for my money, the first classic fantasy trilogy of the twenty-first century. I adore her writing, the way she lives inside her characters and makes them live and breathe. After the second book ended on an infuriating cliffhanger, man does this one stick the landing. I'm torn between wanting more adventures with these characters, or at least in these worlds, and wanting this great three-part story to stand on its own without being diluted.
    It's sitting on my coffee table, but I'm doing my damnedest to save it for a weekend trip next month when I know I won't have access to the internet. One of the few authors currently publishing for me, where every book merits a blind buy, and none make me regret the decision.
     
  6. 6 Mar 31, 2017
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2017
    DaveF

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    I'm listening to it. I'm a Scalzi fan. I've bought every book he's written, his serialzed books and a couple novellas. I've ignored only his short stories.

    This book is The One Where Scalzi Discovers the F-Bomb.

    It's getting tedious.

    (But it's still a fun story so far. Because, Scalzi.)
     
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  7. Stan

    Stan Producer

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    Way behind the times, but reading "Cell" from Stephen King. Not one of his more famous novels, but it's decent.
     
  8. Carabimero

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    I am finally making time to read The Analects of Confucius...and I am simultaneously taking a college course called, appropriately enough: Books That Matter - The Analects of Confucius.

    I am immersing myself in trying to understand the book's origin, context, and subtext. It's kinda my focus right now and I em enjoying being able to concentrate exclusively on it.
     
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  9. Stan

    Stan Producer

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    That's got to be tough. I took a literature class a few years ago. OMG, the most boring thing I've ever done. The Edgar Allan Poe stuff was good, but some of the other poetry and short stories (Emily Dickinson, the John Updike A&P story), just not my style. Plus you then have to discuss and dissect them with the rest of the class.

    Had to write a paper on "A Rose for Emily". creepy, really weird story. Give me some Stephen King or John Grisham, much more enjoyable. :D
     
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  10. Carabimero

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    When I was in high school and even college I really resented "literary" books being crammed down my throat. They had nothing to teach me then, because I wasn't receptive. I simply hadn't lived long enough to gain the perspective necessary. But now I am 52, a novelist of 30 years, and just retired from the film business. I am hungry for this stuff. I think it may help me take my writing to the next level. And so far I am not disappointed. You're right. It's hard. But I'm enjoying it.

    Still, I get what you are saying. A few months from now, I may feel the same way you do :)
     
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  11. bujaki

    bujaki Cinematographer

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    To each his own, but I'll take "A Rose for Emily" over King or Grisham any day. When I was in my 20's I decided to read Faulkner's Yoknapatawpha's books in the order he wrote them. My life was deeply enriched for having done so. I also read all of Proust's Remembrance of Things Past as part of a college course, and I regretted reading the last sentence. I even wept because I'd never learn anything further about those fascinating characters. That's how great literature affects my life.
     
  12. 12 Apr 10, 2017
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    Stan

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    56 and I took out an old literature book I kept from school, one of those three inch thick monstrosities, promising myself I'd try to get through some of it. Not working out. Maybe more into "lite" reading. Grisham, King, Clive Cussler, old Michael Chrichton stories. Can't do the "classics" yet. Recently read "Airframe" by Crichton, but to be more mature, "Krakatoa" by Simon Winchester. I do read real stuff at times :rolleyes:

    When I was in high school, took a year of "Humanities" classes. Allowed me to skip all the English Lit stuff, got a year of college credit so never had to take those classes. It was an easy "A". We read Greek and Roman mythology, no diagramming sentences, or other boring chores, I loved it.

    I thank I came out alright, ain't nothin wrong with my readin and writin and rithmetik. My speling is usualy pretty descent. :banana:
     
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  13. bujaki

    bujaki Cinematographer

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    Nothing wrong with light reading, but my undergraduate and grad work was in comparative literature, so I'm far more critical of my reading choices. I'll be 67 this month, so I still like my brain to be challenged on a daily basis. As far as movies are concerned, there is junk I won't stoop to, but there is thrash I love along with other highfalutin' stuff.
     
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    Carabimero

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    I'm trying to get into intertextuality; that is, how books talk to one another through the ages. The more I read the canon, the more I've started to see a conversation taking place over thousands of years.

    It's like The Beatles doing Revolver, then the Beach Boys responding with Pet Sounds, then the Beatles answering with Sgt. Pepper. I'm seeing the same thing happening with the great books. Chaucer wrote The Canterbury Tales and then someone replied to Chaucer with a book. And that conversation is still going today.

    Reading gives me a chance to understand people from the past. Writing gives me a chance to talk to people in the future. I want to be part of that ongoing conversation. But if I have any chance of being taken seriously, I have to get serious. Less TV. More mental focus. More time with my butt behind the desk.

    That's why I am not just reading a book; I'm studying its context. What was going on in the world at the time it was written? How was the language of the day different? Context is opening up whole new worlds, and suddenly what I once thought was a bunch of b.s. occasionally has profound meaning for me.

    The more I focus, the more I let my ego shrink, the more I start to understand something bigger than myself happening in literature. It's like I am discovering another set of eyes. Another set of sensibilities. It's pretty freaking fantastic. And its enriching my life, week after week, month after month, by leaps and bounds.

    I believe I have a potentially great book in me (I think a lot of people do). The question is: Am I willing to do the hard work necessary for the next several years to to give myself an opportunity to get it down on paper?

    I'm gonna find out. And it starts with reading, not writing. Stephen King said, "If you don't have the time to read, you don't have the time--or the tools--to write."

    He's right. I stopped writing for so many years because I stopped reading.
     
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  15. bujaki

    bujaki Cinematographer

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    Alan, that's why I studied Comparative Literature: Medieval Period. Besides my native language, Spanish, I am conversant in English (naturally), French and Italian. For my medieval lit courses I chose to learn Latin, Old English (Anglo Saxon), Middle English, Old French, Old Provencal, and Old Norse (Old Icelandic). The last one enable me to read rudimentary intertitles in silent Swedish, Norwegian and Danish films. As you wrote above, reading opens up new worlds, but learning languages opens you up to subtleties and sensibilities you barely suspected. Learning is such a wonderful experience, and you never stop till you die (at least, I hope I don't).
     
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  16. Dave Upton

    Dave Upton Audiophile
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  17. Carabimero

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    I can really appreciate what you're saying. Thanks for your post. I'm tackling the Analects of Confucius. One of the many problems is that some specific Chinese characters have many possible English translations. As an example, this morning I discovered that 孝 xiao can easily be rendered “filial piety,” “family reverence,” and “filial conduct,” just to name a few.

    I'm sure I don't have to explain the problem to you. But I am doing my best to learn the language on the printed page. Even mastering bits here and there opens huge doors of understanding. Above and beyond how successful I turn out to be, I'm finding the language endeavor alone to be a wonderful, mind-widening challenge.

    What an adventure one text can be :)
     
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  18. jcroy

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    I remember when I was in college, many engineering and/or hard science majors really hated taking "humanities" type of classes.

    The easiest loophole around this was taking the "logic" classes, which were basically not much different than manipulating + diagramming sentences as if it was like "algebra". (Administratively the "logic" courses were counted as "humanities" type courses, and not as engineering/science type classes).
     
  19. bujaki

    bujaki Cinematographer

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    But engineers and hard science majors have to think logically, right? So logic courses make sense. Where I live, Texas, some legislators are trying very hard to eliminate critical thinking (logic) courses from high school curricula. Food for thought...
     
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  20. Stan

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    Love logic related classes, puzzles, etc. I'm really good at them. Guess my brain is wired a bit differently than others :angry:

    Sad that Texas may eliminate the courses. They require some actual thought, not just repeating rote memories.
     

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