Blue Specks on Laserdisc Picture?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Joey B, Aug 22, 2002.

  1. Joey B

    Joey B Stunt Coordinator

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    I'm fairly new to the Laserdisc world and am wondering what would cause Blue specks on the picture when watching a disc. Anyone know? Is this "laser rot?"

    Thanks
     
  2. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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    How many, how frequent, and how much of the disc does it affect?

    "Laser rot" usually manifest itself as a shower of multi-colored specks. It gets worse over time. If you're only talking about a few specks in a particular part of the disc, it's more likely the typical kind of defect that plagues analog formats.

    M.
     
  3. Joey B

    Joey B Stunt Coordinator

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    Honestly I don't know. I'm looking at an ebay item and the seller describes the discs as having blue specks. I guess I'll email him and find out how frequent and how bad.

    Thanks
     
  4. John P Grosskopf

    John P Grosskopf Second Unit

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    It's Blue Meanie Measles!!! [​IMG]
    If it's the dreaded Blue Meanie Measles, it can look like rot, but is actually something a little different: a dirty pressing.
    I have had several LDs with this syndrome, Four Weddings and a Funeral being one of them. It had the Blue Meanie Measles from day one.
    I went back to the store for a second LD, and it had the same thing. So did a third. I finaly had to get one from Ken Cranes by mail to get a good one.
    I called the manufaturer and told them the problem. They surmised that the discs came from a "bad batch" since all three discs came from the same store.
    Apparently during pressing some production areas can become contaminated, and airborn particulates can get between the data layer and the plastic coating. In fact, most LDs have a least a few of these imperfections, but are so few as to be almost unnoticable. In cases of BMM, the contamination can occur on one side, both, in patches, or all over the disc.
    The difference between it and regular rot is that over time it does not progress to fully obscure the picture. Rot occurs when the top plastic layer is faulty and allows air into the aluminum data layer where it begins to corrode. Once it starts, it spreads, so a disc that played fine a year ago could now look like watching a drive-in movie in a rainstorm.
    Either way, I'd avoid the disc unless it is something truly rare. What may be minor to the seller could be major to you.
     

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