Blown Tweeter ?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Joe Barefoot, Jul 25, 2002.

  1. Joe Barefoot

    Joe Barefoot Stunt Coordinator

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    I have been trying out a pair of Linn Espeks for a few days. I have them passively bi-amped with 2 Parasound 1205's. Last night, while showing the speakers off to some friends, listening to Jethro Tull at fairly high (but not extremely high) volume, I noticed two brief flickers of light from the left tweeter. I just happened to be admiring the left speaker at the time for some reason. The tweeter is now silent. What is the most likely cause of a blown tweeter? I'm hoping it's a speaker fault and not from my amps or wiring. Thanks.
     
  2. Gary PT

    Gary PT Agent

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    Tweeters make the world's best fuses. It sounds as if it blew either as a result of "dirty", distoted high frequencies, which could have been caused by an underpowered amp clipping, or overdriving the speakers with too much power. Add to that what was probably an older Tull recording, probably not the cleanest, plenty of volume, and you have a blown tweeter.
    edit: Oh, just noticed the Parasound Amps. You can probably cross underpowered amps off the list.
     
  3. Joe Barefoot

    Joe Barefoot Stunt Coordinator

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    OK...the amps should be plenty powerfull, especially bi-amped. The speakers should be able to handle a lot more than I was giving them. The Espeks can be actively tri-amped with 'lots-o-watts', so that just leaves the not so new recording. That's kind of scary to think that older CD transfers can blow tweeters...'cause I've got a lot of older CD's. Someone please tell me it was a defective tweeter!
     
  4. Rob Rodier

    Rob Rodier Supporting Actor

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    Sounds like a defective tweeter to me. Honestly. That just does not happen. In addition, to actually see some type of flicker makes it even more odd. Double check your connections, but it seems like the speaker is at fault to me.

    -rob
     
  5. John F. Palacio

    John F. Palacio Supporting Actor

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    "I noticed two brief flickers of light from the left tweeter. I just happened to be admiring the left speaker at the time for some reason. The tweeter is now silent. What is the most likely cause of a blown tweeter?"

    Tweeters are easily blown. This one could have been previously pushed too hard and was just "waiting to go".

    The fact you saw light coming from it indicates serious power being send to it at the time it passed away though.

    Stuff happens.
     
  6. Holadem

    Holadem Lead Actor

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  7. Joe Barefoot

    Joe Barefoot Stunt Coordinator

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    From what I have gathered, it sounds as though it was a speaker defect. They are just a demo pair, so no...I don't have to keep them. I am considering getting a pair though. As compared to my Klipsch Rf3 II's, they are more even...with smoother highs are more full mid range. The thing that confuses me is that because the Klipsches are more efficient, I had to re-calibrate the RS3's way down when using the Linn fronts. The surrounds are now more prevalent and pleasing. The Linn fronts seem to be a better match with the Klipsch surrounds than the Klipsch fronts??? This stuff never ceases to amaze me.
     
  8. Joe Barefoot

    Joe Barefoot Stunt Coordinator

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    I just heard back from the Linn factory. The first thing the guy said was that the amp clipped. I heard nothing when it happened and wouldn't have noticed...but I was looking directly at the tweeter at the time. Wouldn't I have heard something if the amp "clipped"? He said that the Linn speakers have no protection circuits, to improve the sound, and that the amp caused the problem. The suggested solution was to either turn the volume down or buy a new amp. He also surmised that the reason that I can crank the Klipsch RS speakers is because they do have protection circuits. I'm not a speaker or amp expert but I just don't buy this. I doubt that the Klipshes have protection circuits, and the reason that they go so loud is just because they're efficient. Granted the Linns have to receive a lot more power to get the same volume, but I have a hard time believing that it is an amp problem. They are going to FedEx a new tweeter at no charge...apparently they are a great company. I'm in no way slamming Linn, they make the nicest audio stuff I have ever laid eyes and ears on, but I would like to learn. Any comments?
     
  9. John F. Palacio

    John F. Palacio Supporting Actor

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    "Any comments?"
    A couple. No manufacturer is just going to say "yeah, our tweeters do blow, now and then!" They are always going to come back with something, even if it's "You were playing too loud"
    Normally you can hear clipping. But it would be just guessing as to whether you did clip or not.
    I am with you on the protective circuitry explanation. It doesn't "sound right".
    There would be only one way to find out as to whether these speakers will satisfy you and hold up, even with a higher powered amp. That would be to borrow such an amp and give it another ride. Reason being; If you try this again with the same amp and end up with another blown tweeter, you are back to square one, meaning not knowing whether a clipping amp caused it or the speakers won't take your SPL's.
    Good luck.
    John
    PS. Love your Island, how's the weather? Nice, Very Nice or Fantastic?[​IMG]
     
  10. Ken Garrison

    Ken Garrison Supporting Actor

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    You really need to have a cross over capacitor hooked up in line with the tweeter. Unsolder the positive wire from the tweeter and solder a capacitor in it's place and solder the wire on the positive end of the capacitor. This will block most of the BASS going to the tweeter. You can get these capacitors at Radio Shack or any other electronics store.
     
  11. John F. Palacio

    John F. Palacio Supporting Actor

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    "You really need to have a cross over capacitor hooked up in line with the tweeter. Unsolder the positive wire from the tweeter and solder a capacitor in it's place and solder the wire on the positive end of the capacitor. This will block most of the BASS going to the tweeter. You can get these capacitors at Radio Shack or any other electronics store."

    I hope this is a joke. If not you should be arrested.
     
  12. Joe Barefoot

    Joe Barefoot Stunt Coordinator

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    I can't imagine soldering a $.50 cent radio shack capacitor on a beautiful Linn speaker. Don't let Linn hear you say that or you will have a bunch of angry guys in kilts show up at your door [​IMG] . I appreciate all responses!
     
  13. Ken Garrison

    Ken Garrison Supporting Actor

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    Well, what I mean is, WHY send the full sound spectrum to a speaker that's only meant for HIGHS? Why not block the low end? IMO, this can improve the sound quality. My KLH speakers have the crossover capacitors on them. In fact, just about any woofer/tweeter set of speakers you find will have one of them crossover capacitors soldered in line with the tweeter. This improves sound quality by blocking sounds that don't need to be going to the tweeter, and also protects it. What you could do is get a crossover circuit board for each speaker and this will send the lows to the woofers, the mids to the squawkers, and the highs to the tweeters. This will improve the sound quality by sending the right sounds to the right type of speakers.
     
  14. Joe Barefoot

    Joe Barefoot Stunt Coordinator

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    Ken,
    I get your drift. Linn amps (which I don't have) can be chipped to do exactly what you are talking about. They call it Activ (active) bi or tri-amping. And yes, it does improve the sound. But with passive (or fools bi-amping) like I am doing, doesn't the cross-over do what you are talking about? It only allows the highs to go to the tweeter, mids to woofer?
    Joe B
     
  15. John F. Palacio

    John F. Palacio Supporting Actor

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    "Well, what I mean is, WHY send the full sound spectrum to a speaker that's only meant for HIGHS? Why not block the low end?"

    That exactly what the CROSSOVERS in speakers do. They already "block" the lows from tweeters. It is already built in in ANY speaker you buy, and in the case of Linn and other high end products it is a most carefully designed and tested assembly.

    FYI capacitors come in many capacity values (Farad rating), voltage ratings, polarized & non polarized, as well as different construction materials that differ in performance from one another.

    Your suggestion to "Go to Radio Shack, buy a capacitor and solder it in series with the tweeter" is not only absurd, but nebulous as well, being that capacitors come in so many varieties.
     

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