Blockiness on TV. Can't get rid of it.

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Shawn Shultzaberger, Dec 26, 2001.

  1. Shawn Shultzaberger

    Shawn Shultzaberger Supporting Actor

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    I've got this blockiness that I can't seem to get rid of. Maybe pixelation? And it's driving me crazy.

    Last year I purchased the Dish500 package. I used the supplied cable (RG-6 is it?) from the dish to my wall. From the wall I used a very old cable to go to the SAT receiver then another old cable to go from that into my VCR then out to my TV. These "old" cables were definitely not RG-6. During all this time I've always noticed that in some sky shots (and other shots) that I could see a distinct pixelation between the varying degrees of color. It was like the shades of colors were separated.

    So, I went out and purchased all new RG-6 cables a few days ago. Everything running from the wall outlet to the SAT receiver, to VCR to TV is RG-6 gold series. Now the separation of color is gone but the blockiness is worse and there seems to be a faint ghosting effect.

    I've tried taking the VCR out of the chain but that didn't work. I've adjustted and readjusted the settings on my TV but it didn't work. I don't know what else it could be. The signal strength of the SAT is 110+. Very high for our area.

    Is there anything else to try or check?

    [EDIT] - ooops, I forgot to mention that I also use the S-Video out from the SAT receiver into my Outlaw 1050 and then into the TV. The S-video cables are also gold series. Now that I think of it I will switch between the two to see which gets rid of the blocks. Maybe it's just a bad cable.
     
  2. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    Probably poor quality source material due to watering down the video so more channels can be crammed onto the satellite doing the broadcasting to your dish. What they probably did is increase the MPEG compression. All digital video uses some MPEG compression, they can vary the amount.
    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  3. Shawn Shultzaberger

    Shawn Shultzaberger Supporting Actor

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    Thanks Allan. I tried switching between the coax and the S-video and although there was a degradation in picture quality between the two, the blockiness still remained. I even tried switching cables to no avail.
    DVD looks perfect. Sat, not so perfect. [​IMG]
    I guess I will have to be content until HDTV is widespread and final.
     
  4. Brian W. Ralston

    Brian W. Ralston Supporting Actor

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    Brian W. Ralston
    Dish has been playing around with their compression scheme for a while now trying to figure out how they are going to carry all the local stations that as of 1/01/02, they must by law now provide. Those must carry stations are taking up a lot of sattelite space they use to use for better quality, rather than quantity.

    I am sure Dish's compression will continue to have issues for a little while till they get things figured out and they get their new sattelites up in orbit to handle the increased channel load (perhaps by march???)

    The problem is on Dish's end...not your connections.
     
  5. Joe Szott

    Joe Szott Screenwriter

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    Shawn,
    I have the same problem, believe me when I say that I feel your pain. What people have said above makes a lot of sense, as the picture used to be better and has degraded for us recently (last year.) I have heard of a few solutions that you can try:
    * Some folks report that switching from S-video to the older RCA-type cables helped improve the signal a bit. The idea being that the S-Video is actually just amplifying artifacts that the TV further enhances while signal is just as high quality with the older connector. This is free [​IMG]
    * Run Video Essentials or some other calibration DVD to learn the 'best' settings for your set. Usually, the big bonus for TV is to turn down the sharpness so you don't get 'ghosted' images. Calibration DVDs go for $20-$40.
    * Some folks use a line doubler between the sat. box and the RPTV. This is because 480i signals aren't native to a digital HDTV, it wants either 480p or 1080i. The line doubler takes the 480i signal and converts it to one of the HD signals above and then spits it to the TV. I've heard people say this makes a digital RPTV look more like an analog RPTV and removes pixelation. Since a line doubler runs about $800, I would consider this a last resort as it is pricey.
    * Of course, you can also call DISH and tell them you are upset with the service. This is a good idea no matter what you decide, since it's probably the only way they will ever get motivated to fix up their service (it's what I do [​IMG])
     

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