black letter box bars???

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Navid, Oct 10, 2002.

  1. Navid

    Navid Agent

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    I have my Mitsubishi 65411. Why is it that most of my 16:9 movies must show a letter box if they are 16:9 movies??

    It bothers me cause this can cause burn in.. Now just watching movies can cause problems!
     
  2. Jim FC

    Jim FC Stunt Coordinator

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    If there are bars then it isn't a 16:9 movie. Read the back of the DVD box: you may be watching a 2.35:1 movie, which equates to something like 21:9. On a 16:9 TV, these movies leave small bars above and below the image.

    Unless you watch the movie over and over, or keep the contrast and brightness set way too high the way they are when the TV is first turned on, burn-in won't be too big a progblem. There are plenty of posts here about burn-in which you can read to learn how easily to avoid it.
     
  3. Bill Slack

    Bill Slack Supporting Actor

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    I've been watching 1.33 and 2.35 programing on my (calibrated) Toshiba for 2 years now and haven't even the faintest burn-in. Burn-in is something to lookout for, but people take it WAY too seriously.

    Keep the contrast down, and you'll be just fine.
     
  4. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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  5. Steve Phillips

    Steve Phillips Screenwriter

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    Just curious: just where SHOULD the contrast be set? I guess I need to find that VIDEO ESSENTIALS DVD and do a proper set up. I did turn it down from the level it was set when new, but still wonder if I have it too high.
     
  6. Michael TLV

    Michael TLV THX Video Instructor/Calibrator

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    greetings

    Test discs do a good job at telling you where not to set contrast ... not so great on where "to set" contrast at.

    The proper way is with a light meter on the 100 ire window box of one of these test discs. Set contrast to the point where lightoutput is about 15 to 20 ft-l.

    Without a light meter, set it to about 30 to 35% ... as on most sets, this area usually gives about the same light output.

    Regards
     
  7. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

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  8. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    Currently movies are either "standard" (optimized for 4"3 TV sets) or "16:9 enhanced". The latter are optimized for 16:9 TV sets even though the picture does not fit the screen perfectly.
    The current technology does not allow optimizing DVD's for any and all aspect ratios. That would require a continuously adjustable aspect ratio control on the TV where now there are just 4:3 and 16:9 settings and perhaps some modes that subtly stretch the sides more than the middle. And even so, the finished picture will be the same shape as today, not filling the screen perfectly for some movies.
    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  9. Bill Slack

    Bill Slack Supporting Actor

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    Without any tools, you should basically have the contrast set to the lowest point where the color white doesn't look gray. That should certainly be below 50% on most sets . The test disc will say to set it below the point of blooming, but that is generally going to be way too high (and on a lot of sets now, 100%.)

    They do a nice job of getting brightness right, though.

    I've screwed around with my set so much and have such a jerry-rigged switching method, I haven't the faintest idea where my contrast actually is. But it appears as 50% in my menu and maxes out at about 60% and essentially starts over, so I can never even accidentaly (or, more importantly, my guests) leave it set to high. (I was bored and playing with service/design mode.)
     

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