Black bars on Toshiba widescreen TV?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Atho, Feb 9, 2002.

  1. Atho

    Atho Agent

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    Hello all,

    I just purchased a 16 X 9 widescreen TV, a Toshiba 34". The first movie I watched on my Panasonic RP-56 was The Glass house, the widescreen side. The screen was filled right to the max, no complaints.

    The second was Gladiator, now, there were small black bars on the top and bottom, but I changed the Picture mode on the TV to accomidate that.

    The third movie was Lake Placid. Now no-matter what picture size I chose, there were VERY noticable black bars on the top and bottom of the picture, almost like viewing an anamorphic DVD on a 4:3 set.

    Everything to my knowledge is set-up correctly. The DVD player is set to 16/9 mode, using component cables.

    Is there something I am missing? Because if most DVD's are going to do this I'll just return tis one and get a 4:3 set.

    Thanks!
     
  2. ArnaudP

    ArnaudP Stunt Coordinator

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    A widescreen TV (16:9) has an aspect ratio of 1.78:1. If the movie you are watching has an aspect ratio of 1.85:1 or 2.35:1 (ie:Gladiator) you will see black bars on your 16:9 TV. Only movies with 1.78:1 aspect ratio won't show black bars. Check the box of the DVDs to find out the aspect ratio of the film you're about to watch.
     
  3. Jesse Leonard

    Jesse Leonard Second Unit

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  4. Allan Mack

    Allan Mack Supporting Actor

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  5. Bruce Hedtke

    Bruce Hedtke Cinematographer

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    Is the Lake Placid DVD enhanced? Discs that are not enhanced will have larger black bars on a widescreen set.

    Bruce
     
  6. Jesse Leonard

    Jesse Leonard Second Unit

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  7. MikeHarley

    MikeHarley Extra

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    I just purchased a 16:9 Mitsubishi HDTV-ready set and have experienced the same thing. Bottom line, get used to it.

    I've rented several DVD's, and some are full screen (16:9), and some have black bars. Until everyone uses the exact same format (unlikely) we have to put up with it.

    The one thing that concerns me is the owners manual specifically says DO NOT watch more than 15% of your programming with fixed images, including black bars. I don't watch a ton of TV, so I hope I am not frying my set!
     
  8. Dave H

    Dave H Producer

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    I'm just curious: burn-in from black bars is still a possibility on a 16x9 RPTV set if one watches a lot of 2:35 material, correct?
     
  9. MichaelGomez

    MichaelGomez Stunt Coordinator

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    I thought that the black bars were made so that burn in isn't as much of a factor. Kind-of like the TV stations changing their logos to avoid burn in (you know, the little annoying picture in the bottom right corner). Am I wrong?

    Mike
     
  10. Cameron Seaman

    Cameron Seaman Supporting Actor

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    I think Lake Placid is NON-ANAMORPHIC widescreen, so you would set your TV to what ever setting cuts off the top and bottom. On my Toshiba it is THEATERWIDE 2.
     
  11. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Re burn-in: If your white level (i.e., "contrast") is set reasonably low, this should not be a problem.

    Remember, a picture tube has a fixed aspect ratio, either 4:3 or 16:9. Film aspect ratios differ, all the way from 1.37:1 to 2.4:1. Obviously, some letterboxing will still be involved. (Try screening the Ben-Hur DVD for an extreme example. The film has a 2.76:1 aspect ratio.)
     

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