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Bit rate of Episode I DVD (1 Viewer)

Danny_Tam

Agent
Joined
May 28, 2002
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30
Does anyone have any idea what the average bit rate on TPM DVD is? I imagine its fairly high, despite the rather gaudy looking menu and design. I hear some SONY DVD players have a bit rate measurer, so maybe someone out there has an idea.
I just ask out of curiosity. :)
Dan
 

Jeff Pounds

Second Unit
Joined
Jun 6, 2000
Messages
385
Danny,
First, welcome to HTF! :)
I have a Sony DVD player where you can check the bit rate.
I can't remember the exact number, but the average bit rate on TPM is basically the same as other Dolby Digital-encoded titles.
So if you are wondering if it is more bit-rate intensive than other DD movies, it's not. It does have a lower bitrate than DTS titles, which uses less compression.
If you are looking for the exact rate, I'm sure some of the DD and/or DTS experts can chime in with the exact bit rate...
And by the way, the menu design doesn't impact the bit rate while the movie is playing. They are seperate "files" on the DVD.
Once again... welcome!
 

Matt DeVillier

Supporting Actor
Joined
Sep 3, 1999
Messages
773
The DD5.1 audio track is fixed at 384Kbps, but the video bitrate is variable (and I'm not sure what it is off hand).
 

BenjaminG

Stunt Coordinator
Joined
Apr 4, 2002
Messages
154
The audio bitrate (at least on R2/R4) is 448 Kb/s.

I *think* the average bitrate is 6 mb/s.
 

Adam Lenhardt

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2001
Messages
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So if you are wondering if it is more bit-rate intensive than other DD movies, it's not. It does have a lower bitrate than DTS titles, which uses less compression.
Which is apples and oranges... two different codecs use two different bit management schemes. Dolby Digital is more efficient with it's bits.

That said, 448 bps DD has little chance against full bitrate DTS.
 

Dan Hitchman

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Jun 11, 1999
Messages
2,712
384 kilobits/sec on the DD AC-3 RF LDs.

384 or 448 kilobits/sec at 48 kHz sampling on the DD DVDs.

1.44 Megabits/sec at 44.1 kHz sampling on DTS LDs and CDs.

754 kilobit/secs or ~1.5 Megabits/sec at 48 kHz sampling on DTS DVDs. However, at the ~1.5 Megabits/sec rate DTS can also do 96 kHz if so encoded and then decoded on a DTS 24/96 processor. DTS's "Coherent Acoustics" codec also has the ability to add separate discrete channels to the 5.1 channel core stream, even beyond the DTS-ES 6.1 discrete they do now.

JVC's D-VHS/D-Theater HD tapes can have 640 kilobits/sec Dolby Digital and ~1.5 Megabits/sec DTS 24/96 encoding. There can be room for other audio formats like multichannel PCM too depending on the length of the movie. Will the studios take advantage? Only time will tell.

Who knows what the final specs. for HD-DVD will be.

Dan
 
Joined
Nov 18, 1999
Messages
20
The average bitrate of the R2/R4 comes up as 6.15Mbit/sec using Bitrate Viewer, but that's being computed with the multi-angle, multi-language opening title crawl included, which is nearly 2 minutes' worth of seriously high total data rate. When Bitrate Viewer runs into multi-angle material, its graph quite literally shoots off the scale, past 10Mbit/sec and into the bitrate version of outer space :)
(If you have the R2/R4 DVD and haven't noticed this rather neat "feature", by the way, choose a subtitle language from the language selection menu and start the movie from the beginning... you can try 'em all by changing subtitles from this menu and hitting "resume film".)
The second layer has a substantially higher average bitrate than the first, too, so it's not completely informative to quote an entire-movie average rate. Suffice to say that on the R2/R4 there is about 2GB of unused space :)
- Anthony
 

Jeff Pounds

Second Unit
Joined
Jun 6, 2000
Messages
385
Which is apples and oranges... two different codecs use two different bit management schemes. Dolby Digital is more efficient with it's bits.
I know... I was just trying to give as simple explaination as possible without making a commentary on either codec...
Didn't want this to become a DTS vs. DD war! ;)
 

Adam Barratt

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Oct 16, 1998
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2,344
Real Name
Adam
1509kbps DTS can't fully encode 96kHz material. An extra 512kbps of 'headroom' information is needed for DTS 24/96.

Adam
 

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