Bi Wiring?

ITJim

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Dec 19, 2006
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Jim
Ok I have bought a 7.1 reciever and I do not plan on using but a 5.1 setup.

The reciever manual states that I can run the two left over channels to my front speakers...

Ok I have single + - teminals....Can I wire these up to my speakers?

It would give me 200watts on my front speakers that are 3 way tower speakers rated @ 250 RMS

Like ++ l -- and would that give me the 200 watts?
 

Nick:G

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Nick Gallegos
Actually, what your describing is bi-amping, which is different from bi-wiring. Bi-amping can potentially give your speakers a little more control and dynamics, but it really depends on the speakers and the amplifier (yes, this can get very technical). The whole idea here is to give your high/mid frequencies separate amplification from the low frequency.

Speakers equipped with only one pair of terminals are not designed for bi-amping, nor should you attempt to do so. Speakers you can do this on will have two pair of terminals (or perhaps more), one for the bass, and one for the mid/treble. In addition, their crossovers are optimized for bi-amping or bi-wiring.

Now bi-wiring is where the output end of the cable (amplifier end) is full-range (single +/-) and then splits into two separate frequency channels at the input end of the cable (speaker end) to where there's four total wire ends. Exotic speaker cable manufacturers often prepare single bi-wire cables with the thicker gauge wire splitting off to the bass terminals and the thinner gauge wire running to the mid/treble terminals, based on the highly debated theory that thinner wire will sound better for high frequencies and thicker wire is better suited to bass frequencies. Hard-core electrical engineers would likely laugh out loud at this theory, but then again, not even the foremost scientists in the world can actually explain how an electron passes over a run of wire.

Now getting back to the original question, the only way you'd able to achieve what your doing is by bridging those channels together before they are actually output to the speakers. Most receivers won't let you do that. But assuming you could bridge, you're not necessarily doubling power - but you would probably notice subtle differences in dynamics and control.
 

JohnRice

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I would connect everything traditionally. You need to know what you are doing and have the right speakers to do what you are suggesting. Mistakes can and often will result in the death of your receiver. Just leave well enough alone.
 

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