Bi-amping the 1014tx

Discussion in 'AV Receivers' started by RyanJE, Feb 9, 2005.

  1. RyanJE

    RyanJE Second Unit

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    Since I only have a 5.1 setup the 1014 allows me to use the back surrounds as a Bi-Amp instead. Has anyone done this and would it provide any noticeable difference. I ask because this article claims it should not be done.

    http://www.axiomaudio.com/tips_biwir..._biamping.html

    I always thought Bi-amping was good until I read this.

    What do you guys think??
     
  2. John S

    John S Producer

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    "Bi-amping, or biamplification, is used mainly in professional sound reinforcement applications, where extremely high levels of loudness are required. Here big, separate amplifiers powering the low frequencies, and smaller amps for the midrange will increase overall output. Sometimes they will use a separate outboard electronic crossover (the speaker's internal crossover is disabled or bypassed entirely) so the operator can vary and adjust individual crossover frequencies, tailor the “slope” of the crossover to match the strengths of each set of drivers, and also adjust the relative sonic balance of bass, midrange and treble to suit the environment. This is important for huge auditoriums or outdoor events where separate arrays of treble and midrange horns are operating with big “bass bins,” but such systems have no place in domestic home theater systems in normal rooms. Bi-amping, or biamplification, is used mainly in professional sound reinforcement applications, where extremely high levels of loudness are required. Here big, separate amplifiers powering the low frequencies, and smaller amps for the midrange will increase overall output. Sometimes they will use a separate outboard electronic crossover (the speaker's internal crossover is disabled or bypassed entirely) so the operator can vary and adjust individual crossover frequencies, tailor the “slope” of the crossover to match the strengths of each set of drivers, and also adjust the relative sonic balance of bass, midrange and treble to suit the environment. This is important for huge auditoriums or outdoor events where separate arrays of treble and midrange horns are operating with big “bass bins,” but such systems have no place in domestic home theater systems in normal rooms. Additionally, it puts control of the relative smoothness and tonal balance into the hands of the sound system operator, a dangerous tool for all but the most experienced sound reinforcement experts. It also partly explains why the live sound at so many concert events (not all, mind you) is so awful."



    Take carefull head of this line in the statement....
    "Additionally, it puts control of the relative smoothness and tonal balance into the hands of the sound system operator, a dangerous tool for all but the most experienced sound reinforcement experts."

    I would assert this is true and why most people should not do it. I am going to do it. Using your rears to bi-amp your fronts only present an even greater challenge, your gain staging will be completely different for your fronts. I think knowing what I know from decades of live sound work and studio engineering work that I would either do them all or not do it at all myself.
     
  3. RyanJE

    RyanJE Second Unit

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    Thanks Jon,

    I ask because theres an internal setting that switches the receiver from 7.1 to 5.1 bi-amp front. In light of this would you still say dont do it. This setting is also taken into account while using auto calibration.
     
  4. John S

    John S Producer

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    Sure would be kicking for Music!!!! Go fer it..
    Please give me your impressions please. I am going to do it myself. You will also need to re-engineer the cross over sum in your fronts...

    You want no coil or connections to the low driver, straight from the amp in other words.

    In a 2 way speaker, yould would also connect directly to the tweeter, in a three way it's a little more complicated, but generally you would connect to the mid driver, and have at least a cap in the path to the tweet.

    Is there much information about this mode in your doccumentation? I mean where does it cross? I would assume there is some built in cross over in the AVR just for this? I just don't know enough about the feature, and have never seen it before an any AVR.
     
  5. RyanJE

    RyanJE Second Unit

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    Not a whole lot of info. It just says you can use the 7 channel for bi-amp instead and have to set it that way in the avr. It also says you must remove the bridge(obviously) and DO NOT REMOVE the crossover. I dont know enough to fudge with this. I may not bi-amp.
     
  6. John S

    John S Producer

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    Requires some expertise indeed. There are way dangers crosssing over electronically / line / pre level before the amp. Real easy to cook tweets and mids this way, being sure is just a harsh reality when doing so.
     

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