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BFD question, DSP-1100P or DSP-1124P (1 Viewer)

Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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Yes. The only difference, I think, is that the 1124 has improved capabilities for set-up with a PC (someone correct me if I’m wrong there).

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Wayne A. Pflughaupt
 

Kevin C Brown

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The 1124 is 24 bit capable, the 1100 is 20 bit. I think the sampling freq is 46kHz in both cases.

I had an 1100. Liked it a lot. I misguidedly thought that hey, I want the newsest, latest, and greatest. So I got the 1124. Not as happy, because my 1124 hums. Tightening down tha case screws helped, but it still bugs me. Not a generic difference between the 1100 and 1124 I don't think, just that I got a "bad" one. :)
 

Joey Skinner

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Thanks for the replies. I posed this question at the Cult of the Infinitely Baffled site and Thomas W said "the only difference between them is 20bit vs 24bit sampling. That's inaudible at subwoofer frequencies." So I'll just go with whichever I can get the cheapest.
 

Max F

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Mine hums too Keven:thumbsdown:

But, I keep mine hidden away in the corner on top of the subwoofer. Overall, its is pretty ungly piece of equipment. My wife kindof freaked when she saw it. However, once you set it up you can hide it, leave it on, and forget about it. :emoji_thumbsup:

I love mine! It even made my Dayton 10" musical.;)
 

David Bikeman

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"I love mine! It even made my Dayton 10" musical."

Thanks, Max. Now you've got me spendin more money. I thought I got the Dayton to "save" money. ;)

David
 

Max F

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Oh man, you'll love it for sure. It'll frustrate the hell out of you at first trying to bring down all of the peaks, but you'll be glad you did. Actually brought one null up too.

Post if you run into any problems. I think it's good advise to attack each peak individually, at first, starting at the lowest frequency ones and work your way up.

Now you'll be able to turn your Dayton up with music and not just shake the room for movies:emoji_thumbsup:
 

Kevin C Brown

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The learning curve is a little steep, but once you get how the interface works, it's a very flexible piece of eqp.

I'm still somewhat surprised Behringer doesn't seem to have much competition with any other company doing something similar. Heck, even for the same exact unit but with a relay to prevent the gawdawful turn on thump, I'd pay more for that. ;)
 

Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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Actually there are a few other feedback elimination devices in pro audio, although I don’t think they offer adjustable parametric filters to go with it.

What surprises me is that no one in the home audio field has noticed how popular these things are come out with a parametric equalizer – not even equalizer specialists like AudioControl.

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Wayne A. Pflughaupt
 

Max F

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Maybe the other companies cannot compete with Behringer on the price. There seems to be a ton of BFDs on the market. There's usually like 5 being sold at once on e-bay (where i got mine). The vast majority (probably 99%) use it based on its primary job - mic feedback cancellation.
 

Kevin C Brown

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Wayne- Maybe there's an opportunity there... ;)

(I always B.S. with a few friends of mine: "If I was to design a power amp, *this* is how I'd do it." Etc.)
 

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