Better bass response with front firing sub????

Discussion in 'Speakers & Subwoofers' started by Todd smith, Oct 22, 2004.

  1. Todd smith

    Todd smith Supporting Actor

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    Hello. I have a new pb2-ultra in a fully enclosed 12x17 room. At my listening position the bass seems weak when running test tones with Avia. When I go to the corners of the room the bass is verry loud according to the spl meter. I have tried moving the sub around the room with similar results. It seems that maybe my seating area is in somewhat of a bass null with the pb2. I am about 2/3 the way into the room lengthwise with a classic 7.1 layout (12x17 fully enclosed rectangular room) so the response should be good here I would think according to what I have read about placing the seating area and so on. I can not move my seating area anywhere else. My question is it possible that maybe a front firing sub could give me better performance in this room? I know it is common for bass to concentrate in corners, but it just seems wierd that such a powerful sub is doing this or maybe it is not wierd.

    The reason I ask about a front firing sub is in my last house I had a similar room, although a bit bigger with a front firing hsu vtf-3 in which the gain was not turned up nearly as high to get to 2-3db over reference. It would seem that a more powerful sub in a smaller room should not have to have the gain set higher which is why I am wondering if a front firing sub might be better in this case.
     
  2. Jon_Liu

    Jon_Liu Stunt Coordinator

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    just a thought, have you tried fiddling with the phase knob on the ultra? I am pretty sure that front firing wouldn't be the solution. If nothing else, take the base plate off and turn it on it's side to have the drivers firing at you!
     
  3. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    Your room is the problem, not the sub, and front vs down isn't going to change that much. As John notes, phase adjusting might help and you may need to play with the location of the sub itself. If that doesn't help, you may need to EQ.
     
  4. Todd smith

    Todd smith Supporting Actor

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    Can eq deal with nulls? I thought eq dealt with taming peaks.
     
  5. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    As John noted, it’s your room not your sub. Specifically:
    I’ve found that these perfectly symmetrical shoe-box rooms have a virtual, across-the-board “dead spot” in the center of the room. The closer you move from center to any boundary, the more bass increases.

    If you’re finding the problem to be isolated to specific frequencies, an EQ may help. However, if you’re finding that the problem is across the full bandwidth, an equalizer will not help. If phase adjustment doesn’t help, you may need some bass traps.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     

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