best wires to use?

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by Andrew S-, Sep 1, 2003.

  1. Andrew S-

    Andrew S- Stunt Coordinator

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    My TV has analog RCAs and an S-Video connection and this is how i currently hooked up to my reciever.

    however, my DVD players has the color difference cables, a dixital Coax, S-video, and the Analog RCA. whats the best way to conenct it? its currently conencted with analog RCA and an S-video cable.
     
  2. scott>sau

    scott>sau Stunt Coordinator

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    Component-video (red, green and blue connectors) cable is best for a quality picture, but only if your TV can accept it.
     
  3. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    The colored RCA’s carry a component video signal. Unless your TV has the same kind of inputs, you won’t be able to use them.

    edit - looks like Scott beat me to it!

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  4. Andrew S-

    Andrew S- Stunt Coordinator

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    i have everything hooked up to the reciever. i dont have the direct connection from the dvd to the tv.

    could i use the component video to connect the dvd player to the reciever and then just leave my current connection to the tv? and if so would this give me any better sound?
     
  5. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    There is really no benefit to connecting your DVD's video signal to your receiver first, aside from a button or two less to push. Connecting the DVD via component to the receiver and then using a lower connection type to the TV gives you no benefit either, as it is the same as just using that connection directly in the first place.

    Your VIDEO connections have no effect on the SOUND connections. If your TV can only accept stereo RCA input, then nothing will make much difference in the sound coming from the TV.

    You will get the best sound from your receiver by using coaxial or optical digital.
     
  6. Andrew S-

    Andrew S- Stunt Coordinator

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    i know there isnt a benefit in hooking it up to the reciever. i just do it because i use my computer with my reciever and tv as well. that way i dont have to switch the cables every time i want my computer hooked up to the tv.

    and i know that i cant get anything better from the tv but i was more concerned with the dvd player. i just thought the component connection carried sound as well. so my best bet would be to switch my dvd to the digital coax for sound correct?
     
  7. scott>sau

    scott>sau Stunt Coordinator

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    Andrew, component-video is just video, just as the yellow RCA (composite-video) is just a video connection. Chains like Best Buy and Circuit City prompt customers to buy video cable for all of their components to go thru the receiver in order for margins to increase. The only benefit was mentioned above, for switching convenience.

    Sound interconnects are coaxial and optical digital audio, RCA and XLR balanced connections.
     
  8. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    Composite, S-video and component each carry video only, no sound.

    Coaxial or optical digital connections are the simplest way to get DD/DTS playback. If your DVD has a built in decoder, you can use analog connections, but that is more cables and may not give as good results, depending on the quality of the DACs in your player vs your receiver. These are the only 3 ways to get multi-channel sound.
     

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