Best picture I can get?

Discussion in 'Displays' started by SteveO, Sep 5, 2004.

  1. SteveO

    SteveO Auditioning

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    I've had my Sony Grand Vega LCD for a few months but now I'm wondering if I'm getting the most out of it.

    Are there any changes I should be making to the factory settings?

    Should I pay an expert to come and take a look at it?

    Thanks for looking.
     
  2. Geraldine/F/M

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    What kind of signal do you have? If you have HD satellite, hook up your receiver via dvi cable or component cable. Same with the hd cable box, although I don't think it compares as well. Factory settings are just that. Companies set the tvs to lab specs. Depending on your lighting, it will make a big difference. Adjust the settings to your preference. Have fun!
     
  3. SteveO

    SteveO Auditioning

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    Right now I just have regular cable connection. I gave up on the dish last year...........total PITA up here in Canada.

    Thanks for the advice.
     
  4. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    Have you calibrated it? This is a requirement for any kind of quality video. Go get Avia or DVE and calibrate if you've not done so yet.
     
  5. andrew markworthy

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    Almost certainly adjusting the settings will bring results. Factory settings are not sacrosanct and often err on the side of over-brightness and too much contrast. They look 'exciting' but usually the viewer is missing a lot of subtlety.

    The following may help:

    (1) make sure you properly callibrate your screen using the Digital Video Essentials disc or the Avia one (search around the forum and you'll find several threads about this). Get it just as the disc says it should be and then watch a couple of 'real' programmes. You may find you want to tweak the settings slightly to suit your tastes. There's nothing 'wrong' with this - it's your TV. However, generally you'll end up with a more satisfying picture if you get it 'officially right' and then tweak rather than just twiddling the controls and hoping for the best.

    An important footnote to this is that you should callibrate for the source you use for your most 'critical' viewing (this will generally be DVD). Be warned however, that when properly set up, a good display will reveal poor source material. E.g. when I callibrated my own LCD, it looked superb on DVD material but on digital satellite, the differences in bitrate between the minority interest and mainstream channels shrieked out.

    (2) make sure your interconnects are okay. It's important that you use cables that are properly shielded. However, IMHO it's not worth spending silly money on these (others may differ on this point!).

    (3) use the best type of link available. For DVD, component video with progressive scan is the best. If you can't manage this, then don't despair - other linkages can be very good as well.

    (4) This may seem obvious but ... Make sure that your set is in a position where it's not competing with a rival light source. A friend of mine has a huge plasma screen and where does he have it? In the bay of a window with the curtains open (some people don't deserve nice things).

    Hope this is of use.
     

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