Best new classic jazz sax player

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Charles J P, Jan 24, 2002.

  1. Charles J P

    Charles J P Cinematographer

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    CJ Paul
    I am looking for recent jazz musician that plays classic jazz type music. To clarify a bit, I am interested in hearing a musician who is recording today but whose influances are from the 40's & 50's classic jazz. I am most interested in a sax player, preferably tenor. Any ideas.
     
  2. John Beavers

    John Beavers Second Unit

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    I'd recommend David "Fathead" Newman, Houston Person or Red Holloway. They're not exactly "new" sax players but they're alive and still putting out classic style jazz albums. Most of your current crop of Sax players are more smooth jazz oriented...yawn.
     
  3. Chris Madalena

    Chris Madalena Stunt Coordinator

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    Check out Chris Potter. He's only been around for a few years. He has some nice cd's out on the Concord Jazz label.

    Also, Michael Brecker has a great new cd out of just ballads.
     
  4. Allen Hirsch

    Allen Hirsch Supporting Actor

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    Try Rebecca Barry she's young (only ~24), but a tenor sax. I've heard her live at the New Orleans Jazzfest, and liked her quite a bit.
    She has a couple of independent-label CDs I believe you can find here:
    http://www.satchmo.com/nolavl/nolaindie.html
    She's a classically-trained saxophonist who went on to study with Ellis Marsalis and Ed Peterson at the University of New Orleans while working toward her master’s degree, where she also learned the styles of Sonny Rollins, Dexter Gordon, Lester Young and John Coltrane.
     

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