Best Direct View TV?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by John DeSantis, Feb 21, 2003.

  1. John DeSantis

    John DeSantis Stunt Coordinator

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    I see Sony has a new Direct View HDTV. The KV-40XBR800. I think this is the largest Direct View made.. if not, Are there more? I want bigger but want to stay with Direct View to avoide all the Calibration issues and hassles associated with RPTV.

    I'm not all that knowledgeable about features. What are the essential things to look for? i.e. 3D Comb Filter, etc. Most people feel Sony's are great TVs albiet overpriced...

    Thanks for any comments and advice.
     
  2. BrianDB

    BrianDB Agent

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    Believe me you won't avoid all of the Calibration Issues. Geometry is a major player in the Direct view field.

    Not trying to scare you just be prepared. Most all upper end Direct views have Geometry covered under the warranty.

    If you have a Costco around check the Toshiba 36HF12 for $1499. It is the "warehouse" version of the 36HF72.

    Yes the Sony is the largest flat CRT based direct-view. If you are looking for larger and price is less of a consideration. Check out some of the HD Plasma displays. I believe you can get them up-wards of 60"
     
  3. John DeSantis

    John DeSantis Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks, but I'm surprised to hear that there are Geometry issues with a direct View TV. I currently have an RCA Home Theatre Series 35" ( circa 1996 ) and never had any of those problems. With the Tech advances since then I would think Geometry problems are a thing of the past. . Is it because of the flat screen? Paying 3K for a TV would leave me expecting NO problems of that sort.

    I can not afford a plasma set. I was just looking for the best, biggest, Direct View.

    Thanks for your response.
     
  4. jeff lam

    jeff lam Screenwriter

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    The flat screens have the geometry problems the worst.

    If you want a widescreen, there is the Loewe Aconda 38" 16x9.

    It's not a flatscreen but it is considered to be the best direct view available. As it should be for the $$$ it cost.
     
  5. BrianDB

    BrianDB Agent

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    The flat-screen challenge is the culprit. It has to do with subtle changes in the earth's magnetic field as well as the fields located throughout your area(house and neighborhood). They are manufactured in one hemisphere then shipped to another that has different properties.

    With the curved displays the beam didn't have to be adjusted toward the extremities. With the flat screen you are taking a beam that is moving naturally in an arc and displaying it on to what is mostly a flat surface.

    Now my conclusions are in no way based in fact. I just know the theory of how CRT's work.

    Now i'm not discounting the Sony, it is the biggest. You will, with out a doubt, run into differing opinions as to whether is is the best.

    A word of caution the 40XBR800 is notorious, from what i've read, for having geometry issues.

    Check out the avsforum direct-view section

    http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/forum...?s=&forumid=64

    Do a search for 40XBR800 and you will most likely be inundated with information regarding this set.

    Now drop the price to around 2k and i'm jumpin all over it.
    My god, It's a 40" direct view HDTV. Except for the fact that I think the set casing is somewhat of an eyesore, it's still a 40" direct view HDTV.
     
  6. John DeSantis

    John DeSantis Stunt Coordinator

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    OK, starting to get the idea. Although, I would think the Engineering would take into consideration the problems that may be encountered in different parts of the World. Guess I will research some more and maybe have to go with RPTV. Then there's all the Calibration hassles.....

    Thing is, although much smaller ( 19" ) the Monitor I'm looking at right now is a Flat screen and has good Geometry.
    ( Samsung 955df )


    Thanks
     
  7. BrianDB

    BrianDB Agent

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    Well you are now talking apples to oranges. In actually the 955df has a slight curvature to it. How I know is that I am also looking at one while typing this. The only flat part of this screen is the glass shield placed about 1/4" in front of the actual tube.

    Don't believe me. Take a close look you will see it. Place your finger near any one of the corners. focus on where your finger touches the glass and move your head around your finger. You should see the gap. Now move it to the center and do the same thing. The gap is noticeably smaller.

    I could be wrong. But that's what I see. Also they call it DyanFlat not PerfectFlat as their higher end monitors are labeled.
     
  8. John DeSantis

    John DeSantis Stunt Coordinator

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    Yeah, guess your right about the Monitor.

    Well, I don't know which way to go now. So many sets out there. I guess I'll start looking at the RPTVs again. That XBR is 300 lbs according to a post at AVS. That's just too much TV for me!
     
  9. BrianDB

    BrianDB Agent

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    I'm not trying to steer you clear of Direct-view, far from it. You will defiantly have more calibration issues with RP than DV. The cost to calibrate is 50% higher with RP and you also will want to have it re-done every 2-3 years due to the nature of the sets. Not to say DVs don't need calibration its just the complexity is quite a bit less.

    I agree the 40XBR is a beast.

    Do your research, narrow your choices, weigh those choices, decide which is best for you based on your needs, and don't look back until you are ready to do it all over again.
     
  10. Bill W.

    Bill W. Stunt Coordinator

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    Toshiba 36HFX72, 232 pounds, (I know, mine went up two flights of stairs, the second only about 36 inches wide and very steep).

    I like the picture better than the XBR's, the price is better and the customer service is far better. (I got mine in exchange for a 36HFX71 when Toshiba couldn't find a service tech willing to travel to my house in the sticks.)

    The HFX is only slightly different from the HF72 mentioned above, but I could never find an HF12 (supposedly the warehouse version) that looked anywhere near as good. I dinked with them at Costco a couple times trying, but either the environment or the source material just wasn't up to it or the TV's, though very similar, are not quite the same.

    Good luck, I LOVE my HFX72!!

    Bill
     

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