Best 16:9 HDTV between 42" and 50" (regardless of technology), some general Q's too.

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jay Sylvester, Mar 8, 2002.

  1. Jay Sylvester

    Jay Sylvester Supporting Actor

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    Sometime between now and June I'll be picking up a 16:9 HDTV, and I'm wondering what sets out there offer the best performance and reliability. Not necessarily the best value, since I'm willing to pay more for better performance. It's not that price isn't an issue, I just don't care as much about saving money if it means making compromises.
    Primary uses for the display in order of importance:
    - DVD (currently a Toshiba SD9200)
    - LD (via an external line doubler I have yet to purchase)
    - Gaming (maybe not, I'm considering placing my current 32" Wega in a separate room with a nice HTIB setup just for this purpose)
    - HDTV if available in my area
    I'm looking for something between 42" and 50" (this is for an apartment). I've given up on tube TVs because of their size limitations even though they have the picture quality that I prefer. I was looking at the new Loewe 38" Aconda, but it's just too small. Right now I'm considering LCD-based rear projection sets and plasma displays, but I was wondering what the pros/cons are for these types of displays.
    I've heard that plasma is still susceptible to burn-in, maybe even moreso than projection sets, while LCD-based RPTVs don't suffer from this problem. That would be a plus since I'm a heavy gamer. Correct or no?
    Another major annoyance of mine is geometry. My current Wega has very visible geometry problems that I haven't been able to correct (a replacement is on the way thankfully). Do plasma displays even suffer from geometry issues? It seems by the very nature of the technology that geometry isn't an issue. Is this true? What about LCD RPTVs?
    As far as conventional projection sets go, I've already ruled out Toshiba because of the automatic 480p->540p upconversion on the new models. It's unfortunate because I really thought the 42H81 was the model for me until I learned of this issue, especially with One Call's current 12-month no interest/no payments deal. $1800 shipped isn't a bad deal at all, and much lower than what my budget calls for.
    Any advice is appreciated, thanks [​IMG]
     
  2. Kelley_B

    Kelley_B Cinematographer

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    You should look at the Panasonic PT-47wx49, I believe MichaelTLV likes the set, and OneCall has them at a very attractive price.
     
  3. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    The Panny is a good set--a topnotch performer at a breakthrough price.

    I'd wait on plasma technology for now. It's getting better all the time, but plasma panels still can't get those black levels right--and that will mean a lot if you're a fan of darkly lit films (Fight Club, Gladiator). The same with LCDs.
     
  4. Stephen Houdek

    Stephen Houdek Second Unit

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    I did extensive research and viewing and picked the Hitachi 53UWX10B. Can't be beat for the price.
     
  5. Matt Stone

    Matt Stone Lead Actor

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    I'm in a similar situation looking at the Panny for May/June. Any good review links?
     
  6. Jay Sylvester

    Jay Sylvester Supporting Actor

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    Anyone ever see the Samsung HCL473W?
    http://ww2.onecall.com/PID_15299.htm
    Dirt cheap price there. I checked out this set at Best Buy, and in my opinion it offered a more film-like image than any other set on the floor, including the Panny. Granted, the floor sets aren't calibrated, but I was still surprised at how good this set looks for the price. The only bad thing I noticed was that white text on dark backgrounds seemed a bit blurry. Otherwise I was impressed.
     
  7. Michael St. Clair

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  8. Jay Sylvester

    Jay Sylvester Supporting Actor

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    The gaming systems will probably end up in another room with my current TV and a HTIB. My primary viewing materials will be DVDs and LDs.

    What's the difference between watching a letterboxed LD on a 4:3 set with a 40" diagonal 16:9 area, and watching it zoomed on a 16:9 set with a 47" diagonal screen size? Does the zooming process itself introduce artifacts or something? I've never seen a zoomed LD.
     
  9. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    Optical zoom on a 16:9 TV simply spaces out the scan lines for letterbox programs so what would be the inner 16:9 area (360 scan lines) occupies the entire screen. THis works with all sources, LD, non-anamorphic DVD, etc. Unfortunately the beam fatness is usually not adjusted so during zoom gaps between scan lines are generally more noticeable.
    Electronic zoom, done right, gives a smoother picutre. By "done right" I mean convert to progressive scan first, then upscale the inner 360 scan lines of picture to occupy all 480 scan lines as drawn.
    I don't know what TV sets do what. Electronic zoom would be nice to ahve on an external doubler or a DVD player but I don't know of any.
    A number of HDTV sets including many Pioneers don't have zoom or 4:3 mnode for HDTV or progressive scan, I actually recommend staying away from all such models.
    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     

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