benefits of video going through receiver?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jeff Ng, Jan 1, 2003.

  1. Jeff Ng

    Jeff Ng Auditioning

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    Can someone tell me what the benefits are when connecting the video through the receiver instead of directly to the TV?

    Here's my setup:

    Panasonic 36HX40 TV
    Panasonic DVD
    Yamaha RX-V630
    VCR

    Here's what I tried:

    EVERYTHING THROUGH RECEIVER
    ----------------------------
    1) connected DVD component video to Receiver
    2) connected DVD digital audio out to receiver
    3) connected VCR audio/video composite to receiver
    4) connected receiver monitor out to TV Video 1 input (composite)
    5) connected receiver component monitor out to TV component 1
    6) TV audio out to receiver

    The video will only come out when I select the video input on the TV (i.e component 1 or video 1)


    Here's the 2nd method:

    ONLY AUDIO TO RECEIVER
    ----------------------
    1) connected DVD component video to TV component 1
    2) connected DVD digital audio out to Receiver
    3) connected VCR audio to receiver
    4) connected VCR video out to TV video 1
    5) connected TV audio out to receiver

    This method takes much less wires and it seems to be the same result...I still switch the input video on the TV and on the receiver.

    I read a few articles on the net and quite a few articles say everything should go through the receiver...I don't see the benefits at all....what am I missing?

    Thanks for any help,

    -Jeff
     
  2. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    The benefit is simplicity, and ease of use. If you go through the receiver, when you switch to DVD for sound from dvd, it will also switch the video, making it one simple step, rather than switching the audio, and then switching the video separately on the TV. I personally don't find this to be very advantageous at all, one extra button to push doesn't phase me in the least. Also, if you have, say lots of sources, a bunch of video game consoles, a couple vcrs, dvd player, laserdisc, satellite TV and on and on, eventually, you're gonna run out of inputs on your TV. No fear, if you have ample inputs on your receiver, you can use that to your advantage to switch them all.

    The downside is that now, while lots of receivers have indeed LOTS of composite and s-video switching capabilities, we're using component cables, and the receivers that switch that have relatively few inputs, but usually often one or two more than on your nice TV. Theoretically, the fewer connections and switches in the trip from the DVD player or whatever to the TV the better, so a die-hard videophile would probably go straight to the TV. The more dangerous downside, is that component cables and hi-def images from say a HDTV tuner, require very high bandwidth, which many receivers do not adequately provide. I say, run the component video which is of highest resolution and most important straight to the tv. Whether you want to simplify things and switch everything thats composite and s-video is up to you. It obviously has its merits if you have lots of things to input and not enough connectors on your tv.

    The last thing to mention is the OSD(on-screen-display) of the receiver. Lots of receivers have them, and while you should be able to navigate the options using the small display on the front of the receiver, its usually handy to use the full menu display on a TV to do this. I don't use any video through the receiver, yet i still connect the video out to the tv, so that I can navigate the menus easier when re-calibrating etc.

    Whew, I think that covered more than you wanted to know, but the answer is basically that the receiver video switching does nothing except simplify things a tad.
     
  3. Jeff Ng

    Jeff Ng Auditioning

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    Thanks for the info Chris.

    However, I'm still confused about the benefit you mention. When I connected the video through the receiver, I still found that I had to switch the input on the receiver and the TV.

    For example, I hooked up the component video out from the dvd to the receiver. Then I hooked the component monitor out from the receiver to the TV's component in connection.
    When I select DVD on the receiver, I only get audio. I still have to switch to COMPONENT 1 on my TV to see the video.

    From my understanding of your reply, it sounds like I shouldn't have to switch to COMPONENT 1 on my TV.

    -Jeff
     
  4. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    Ah, no. You still have to switch to the corresponding input on the TV. Again, another reason why I don't bother going through the receiver, because it really isn't much of a benefit. But, say, you had an HDTV receiver, AND a DVD player, you'd have to switch between two different inputs on your tv, say, an imaginary component 2 for instance, along with switching the audio on the receiver. In your case its not an issue. Again, another reason why the "simplicity" of going through the receiver isnt beneficial.
     
  5. Jeff Ng

    Jeff Ng Auditioning

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    Ah I understand what you are saying now. Thanks for the help. I'll stick with my second setup.

    Thanks!

    -Jeff
     
  6. Greg Kolinski

    Greg Kolinski Second Unit

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    As stated it's less work going through the reciever,save all that extra effort pushing buttons[​IMG] I run all video straight to the TV,and run 1 composite from the reciever just for OSD .I noticed some signal decay on S-Video tranfer going through the reciever,needed certain conditions,but it was there.Even traded in reciever for a new one,it did the same thing,Its a HK 520,so its not junk or anything.Im just real picky[​IMG] ,and once I saw the flaw ,it was all I could look at[​IMG] .Been an dealer auto tech for almost 20 years,have learned that the more connections,the more possible problems,works the same for pretty much all electrical stuff.MORE is NOT always better[​IMG]
     
  7. Seth Paxton

    Seth Paxton Lead Actor

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    The essential thing going on with running video to the receiver is that you are asking the receiver to act as the VIDEO SWITCHER.

    A Switcher simply switches between inputs.

    A TV with multiple inputs also has a video switcher in it and you don't need both.

    The reason for using the receiver to do the video switching is that it can then do the audio and video switching at the same time - the one button type of idea. Select DVD you get DVD, etc.

    HOWEVER, as Jeff just found out, the receiver actually has SEVERAL switchers in it, one for each TYPE OF VIDEO. A switcher for composite video (single connection), maybe an S-Video switcher (funky plug), and even component video (3 cable connection).

    Jeff could still use the receiver to do the switching, but it's really only "helpful" if every video device going to the receiver is using the same type of video.

    Otherwise you end up with just as many outputs to the TV from the receiver as you had inputs to the reciever (say component for the DVD, S-vid for the SVHS, composite for the dish/cable). There is nothing for the receiver to switch between in terms of video because now there is only 1 input for each type of video.

    In such cases it is actually simpler to just connect directly to the TV, as well as making for better quality by simplifying the path.


    One other benefit besides switching convenience would be cable reduction. If you had component connections for all your devices (cable, DVD, VCR) then you could save on a long cable run to the TV/Projector if you are in such a situation.

    Problem there is that you might have HDTV component to go with the DVD, but you certainly don't have component from the VCR and probably don't for regular cable/dish. You could then go back down to S-vid or composite for all the devices including the DVD player, but obviously that's something you only want to do if you have very special circumstances that hurt your ability to run your cables.


    A very nice alternative that at least RCA has in their sets is the AUTO TUNE feature. When you hit DirecTV, DVD, etc on the remote the TV will automatically switch to the input you have assigned it in the menu. I'm not sure who else impliments that feature, but I highly recommend it for any TV.
     

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