Bedini Clarifier

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Chad_Louis, Jan 5, 2002.

  1. Chad_Louis

    Chad_Louis Extra

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    the Bedini Clarifier (that gadget that prepares a CD by removing electrical charge in order to provide a cleaner playback) is made where I currently live (Coeur d' Alene, ID). Out of curiosity, I went out and was able to use this on a few of my CD's. Now one thing to bear in mind is that I am EXTREMELY skeptical about claims such as this product makes, as I feel the home audio market is full of snake oil products that really aren't needed. However, I found that this thing actually worked quite well. The bass and treble were all made more detailed, transparent, and articulate. Bear in mind this is a quite subtle change, but a very impressive one considering the cost/performance ratio. Anyway, I now plan on buying one of these, and recommend that others look into them. They are a relatively cheap way to take your system up a notch.
     
  2. Evan S

    Evan S Cinematographer

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    One of the salespeople at the local HiFi B&M has one of these and swears by it. He says that due to the nature of the CD, theoretically it shouldn't be able to carry an electrical charge (so he admits that the Bedini, technically, shouldn't have even been invented because it proports to remove something that should even be there in the first place). However, he said that anyone can tell the difference in a before/after test. I've never even seen one of these, let alone heard the difference, but I pretty much keep an open mind so who knows?
     
  3. Chad_Louis

    Chad_Louis Extra

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    well, I think that Bedini's device makes sense if you think of it in terms of a capacitor/electrical charge. Don't think of it in terms of electromagnetic charge. Just like rubbing wool on a rubber rod will charge the rubber rod with static electricity, the Bedini I think works the same way. Also, this makes sense from an electrical standpoint in that a thin layer of alum9inum covered with plastic makes an excellent capacitor. Also, Bedini says to show the difference, rub your CD with your shirt, listen to it, then take it out and run it through the clarifier. This also supports my hunch that it basically knocks stray electrons off the CD, in that rubbing the CD with your shirt is just like shuffling your feet so that you zap yourself on a doorknob . . .
     
  4. RicP

    RicP Screenwriter

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    Bedini's claims are specious at best.

    If all you're interested in is reducing the static charge on your CD's, go to your local auto parts store and get a bottle of Rain-X. Apply itlightly to your CD's and buff off. Same exact principle, less money.
     
  5. Chad_Louis

    Chad_Louis Extra

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    hm, I will have to try that . . . regardless of how the thing works, it does, so who knows . . .
     
  6. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    so somehow you think its use resulted in additional information being transmitted to the voice coils of the speakers...amazing

    pls describe how you performed the test.

    not so sure about rainx working on cd material as its principle of operation is to apply a polymeric silicone dissolved in an aqueous/isopropyl alcholic medium that is slightly acidified, to a glass surface in order to repel water.
     
  7. Chad_Louis

    Chad_Louis Extra

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    chu- the clarifier claims that it prepares the surface of the CD so that the CD player can track the information better. Basically it claims to reduce the error rate in the bitstream. So technically, it does not add anything to the signal, or put anything in the recording that is not already there. As for how I did the test, the CD was one that I am very familiar with: Jars of Clay's Much Afraid, track #2 Fade to Grey. This song has a lot of different sounds, from strings and acoustic guitars to synths and even a drum machine in the background. It is a very nice recording, and I use it quite a bit to evaluate systems when I go into places. The actual test took place in my car's system, which has Focal Utopia (JM Labs) components up front running off of an Xtant 603x amp with OZ Matrix subs (it is a very nice sounding setup, very capable of showing minute details in music). I had been listening to the test song (Fade to Grey) in my car on the way over, so that I could have a reference for when I went in to listen (I was not planning on listening to the clarifier, I was actually listening to some Paradigm Monitor 11's). I noticed the clarifier sitting next to the receiver and asked the owner what it was. He offered to show me. He ran my CD through the clarifier, and I then went out to my car and listened to Fade to Grey. And it did make a difference. It is subtle, but it definitely was there. The biggest difference was the bass was more textured and precise.
     
  8. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    the test introduced a bit of bias, you'd have to get 2 copies of whatever it is...treat one and have someone else put them in the player without you knowing...sbt but better than nothing...then try and guess after doing a number of tries
     

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