Bass track: mono or stereo?

Discussion in 'Music' started by TomK, Apr 6, 2004.

  1. TomK

    TomK Stunt Coordinator

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    Hey All,
    I'm not really sure where to post this question. Are the bass tracks in most audio and/or DVD releases in stereo or mono. Not the LFE channel but the actual bass itself.

    Thanks,
    Tom
     
  2. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

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    Bass guitar? Since there is no dedicated bass "channel" unless lfe (as you eliminated)-- I assume you mean bass guitar.

    Depends on the record- although most bass tracks have plenty of high end, so having a "stereo" recording of it could still be directional.

    And actually, even if it was single tracked (mono)- effects or panning could result in a
    "stereo" image.

    So, like eveything else on the record, it's presented in stereo- although the extent to which it takes advantage of such a presentation would vary.

    -V
     
  3. TomK

    TomK Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks Vince. I ask because I'm currently bi-amping my NHT 2.5i's with an NHT SA-2 Subwoofer amp that has a low pass filter. The SA-2 only has one output that I run to both main speakers. It works well but I wonder if I loose anything because, essentially, both of the woofers (in the 2.5i's) are getting the same mono signal.

    Thanks,
    Tom
     
  4. Jeff Ulmer

    Jeff Ulmer Producer

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    Low end is omnidirectional, due to the wavelength of the frequencies being produced. Even if panned in a stereo or surround field, the bottom end will not be heard as directional, so you are not losing anything in that regard. Any imaging will be the result of the mid and high end components of a sound.
     
  5. Ken_McAlinden

    Ken_McAlinden Producer
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    Low end is "nearly" omni-directional. At what frequency one starts losing the ability to make spatial determinations of low frequencies can vary by person, as well. In any case, the fact that it is difficult to notice directional bass effects has been used for a long time. Hi-fi rumble filters for LP and tape sources have been implemented that would combine the channels below, say, 100Hz because rumble noise from the needle or tape head would be generated equal and opposite in each channel.

    Regards,
     

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