bass thump on a phillips desktop stereo versus my paradigm cinema setup

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by felix_suwarno, Jan 8, 2002.

  1. felix_suwarno

    felix_suwarno Screenwriter

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    i got pdr10, and somehow the stereo i heard in toys'r'us could thump my chest stronger than the pdr10. there must be something wrong here.

    the pdr10 sounds full, deep, but on music listening it doesnt really thump my chest. the feeling on my chest is just subtle. on dvd movies the pdr10 is quite good, no problem with it.

    dont ask me about sub position, since what i am talking about is the phillips stereo that only has two 5 1/4 inch woofers. they put that thing on the shelf, yet the thumping effect can be felt from more than 10 feet.

    my receiver is denon avr1802, monster cable 12g all around.

    i got a feeling this is the fault of the cinemas, not the subwoofer. the cinemas have 3 1/2 inch woofer. no bass at all, right?

    i want that chest thumping effect!

    help!
     
  2. Dustin B

    Dustin B Producer

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    My guess would be the phillips is a bass reflex or bandpass design that has been designed in such a way that it has a major peak in it's frequency response in the 50-70hz range (but can't do much below that). The peak is what you are feeling in your chest. While the PDR10 is flat through that range.
     
  3. felix_suwarno

    felix_suwarno Screenwriter

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    hmmm

    what does that mean? as far as i know, flat response should be better. so you guys dont like the chest thumping effect on 50-70 hz frequency since it is not considered a flat response?

    at this point, i am confused. you know what, i really want to hear what htf forumers think sounds best, and compare it to other source of sound i have heard.

    dustin thank you for the reply.
     
  4. Dustin B

    Dustin B Producer

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    I think you pretty much have it. You have been conditioned to expect that muddy boomy thumping. A lot of people think that is real bass, so manufactures of cheap equipment accentuate this range to make the system sound fuller and more impessive then it really is. The PDR10 is a lot closer to real bass. The PDR10 is pretty flat to 30hz and then starts to trail off really quickly below 30hz.

    Where do you have the PDR10 placed. I had two places I could put it in my room when I had it. To the left of my equipment in a corner, or to the right of my equipment which opened to the eating area. It had much better output with the corner loading. Do a search on sub placement. There are some that swear by corner placement and others that like to put the sub in their listening position and then walk around the room until they find the spot where they think it sounds best, then they put the sub in that spot. I'm personally in the corner loading camp. Excite as many room modes as possible and you will get a flatter response (unless your room is a square or cube, then corner loading would be bad).

    I recently replaced my PDR10 with a DIY Tempest Sonosub (follow the link in my sig if you don't know what that is). It doesn't really produce the chest thumping you refer to either. However, when I really turn it up with things like Lenny Kravitz's version of American Woman or the 1812 overture it can make my hair stand up. It's like a pressure wave that goes through my whole body and not just a little thumping in my chest. The PDR10 does this, it just doesn't have the displacement or power to really move a lot of air (and it's missing the sub 30hz stuff).

    In hometheater it's the sub 30hz tones that really do the shaking of things. If you ever get the chance to hear a sub that can do 20hz at well over 100dB you'll understand.
     
  5. felix_suwarno

    felix_suwarno Screenwriter

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    "In hometheater it's the sub 30hz tones that really do the shaking of things. If you ever get the chance to hear a sub that can do 20hz at well over 100dB you'll understand."

    i just bought my pdr10 a few months ago, and that statement made me want to upgrade. grrrrrr grrrrrrr

    i wanted to put the sub on the corner, but the bass is too loud that way. i dont want to disturb my poor, poor neighbor. well, dang...i cant upgrade! really, honest. but i really want to. talking to you guys audio fanatics makes me want to upgrade all the time.

    thanks dustin for your reply
     
  6. Dustin B

    Dustin B Producer

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    Did you try putting it in the corner and then turning either the subs gain or the receivers gain on the sub down?

    When I had mine in the corner I had the subs gain set to just past 3/4 and the level on the receiver at 0 or 1 to 2 dB above 0.
     
  7. ColinM

    ColinM Cinematographer

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    Dustin's right. Every time you move a sub, you need to adjust it relative to the main L/R speakers as it's sound will change.
    I had my SV on the long wall, 3/5 the way down in my room. It had a bump (+2.5 to 4db) from about 28hz to just above 50, then stayed pretty smooth the rest of the way up. That sounded great for music, as the bass guitar and kick drum came across really well when it was matched with the mains.
    I wound up putting it in the corner anyway, and there it's flat from 100 all the way down to below 20HZ, +/- 2db. I had to turn the volume down, I don't know how much..
    But you gotta calibrate.
    - CM
    20-39CS, BTW[​IMG]
     

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