Basic question on AC Outlets & Surge Protector

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jim Zanbehr, Oct 31, 2001.

  1. Jim Zanbehr

    Jim Zanbehr Agent

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    I have a couple basic questions.
    1) The Switched Outlets on the back of most Receivers. Do any of you use them to plug in other components? If so with which components do you use them and which do you avoid? Is it better to plug all of your components directly into a surge protector/power strip?
    2) I understand the basic purpose of using the AC outlets of a surge protector to safeguard electronic equipment, but some of them also have connections for TV Cable/antenna, phone etc. Is that really essential or overkill for a basic home theatre? I don't have Cable installed yet, but do I really need the installer to run it thru the surge protector before it goes into the Receiver or TV? Or where in the chain does it go?
     
  2. Dan Driscoll

    Dan Driscoll Supporting Actor

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    quote: The Switched Outlets on the back of most Receivers. Do any of you use them to plug in other components? If so with which components do you use them and which do you avoid? Is it better to plug all of your components directly into a surge protector/power strip?[/quote]
    I used to, but now I have an HTS2500 and it has enough outlets for all my components. When I did plug into the receiver it was the tape deck and turntable, since these were turned off almost all of the time. If you are just plugging into a surge protector or power strip then I don't think it make's much of a difference, so long as you don't exceed the rating of the outlets. But if you have a filtered power center, like the Monster, Adcom or Panamax, then you should plug each component directly into the power center. Otherwise, noise generated in the receiver could be fed into whatever compoents are plugged into it and visa versa.
    quote: I understand the basic purpose of using the AC outlets of a surge protector to safeguard electronic equipment, but some of them also have connections for TV Cable/antenna, phone etc. Is that really essential or overkill for a basic home theatre? [/quote]
    Having surge protection on your power lines doesn't do a bit of good if the lightning hits the telephone wire that your TiVo is hooked up to. The same is true for your TV cable and antenna. Lightning can travel along any wire, whether it is an power cord or a telephone line.
    Just plug the TV cable from the wall into the input port on the surge protector and then from the output port to the TV. Do the same with any phone lines or 75 ohm antenna cables. This is also a good idea for phone or cable lines attached to computers.
    ------------------
    Dan
    [Edited last by Dan Driscoll on October 31, 2001 at 03:28 PM]
     
  3. jeff lam

    jeff lam Screenwriter

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    You can use the switched outlets on the receiver for anything that doesn't draw a lot of current. EQ's, tape decks, etc... But never power amps or other receivers that have to drive speakers or the like. This will surely damage your receiver and possibly cause a fire. I use mine for my CD changer because my remote can't turn it on/off os it goes on with my receiver and off with it as well.
     
  4. Grant B

    Grant B Producer

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    It depends on what the max rating of the outlet is on the reciever/preamp.
    Currently, my preamp will only allow me to have a small ac transformer plugged in. I use that to trigger all my amps to 'on'
    For lightning strikes etc, I put a surge protector in my fusebox. About $75 and it protects the house (think of everything plugged in to an outlet that would die). Many of those strips are worthless (so says UL)
    ------------------
    "My, my, so many guns much anthrax-esque white powder around town these days, and so few brains." Humphrey Bogart
     
  5. Jim Zanbehr

    Jim Zanbehr Agent

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    Thanks for the info. Putting a surge protector in the fuse box isn't an option. I live in an apartment and they'd frown on tenants playing with the building wiring.
     
  6. Brian Johnson

    Brian Johnson Supporting Actor

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    Another Follow up: Anyone have a preference(brand/model) as far as surge protectors go. I dont want to spend a fortune, but if it will protect my budget equipment its worth a little change. The only thing I will be plugging in (for now) is the tv,receiver,vcr & dvd.
    Oh, i would like my cable-tv coax to be able to run through it also [​IMG] I seen a cheapo that ran cable coax through for 10 bucks at kmart,but I think I can do better than that [​IMG]
     
  7. Brian Johnson

    Brian Johnson Supporting Actor

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    TTT
     
  8. Dan Driscoll

    Dan Driscoll Supporting Actor

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    I'm not generally a fan of Monster, but I have to admit that I am pretty happy with the HTS2500 I installed a few months ago and I do recommend it. But the HTS2500 is a filter and power monitor, in addition to being a surge protector and it runs close to $300. This may be more than you are looking for.
     
  9. Grant B

    Grant B Producer

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    I use a Tripp UPS .

    Besides saving your equipment it'll give your equipment a constant 120VAC. I was having some drop out on DVDs...it stopped when I hooked them up to the UPS!

    Add up all your equipment watts..it should say in the back usually by the power cord...don't forget the monitor/tv.

    add 10% or so and get the model nearest that wattage. Some of them have the phone line/cable protection too

    S/B
     
  10. Kevin C Brown

    Kevin C Brown Producer

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  11. Sheldon

    Sheldon Stunt Coordinator

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    Hi Jim...You can plug most gear into the back of your receiver with the exception of high current amplifiers or anything else that may draw large amounts of current.As for the power bar,I would get something that is surge protected.I am not sure what the difference between a $50-60 one versus a less expensive $15 one is though.[​IMG]
     
  12. Bill Kane

    Bill Kane Screenwriter

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    I like the Belkin Synapse SurgemasterII for @$56 online that I learned about from, IIRC, HTFer KeithH. It claims 1600 joules protection and a 60dB EMI/RF line filter w/ 75 ohm in/out (2 sets) for your RG6 cable(s).
    Try this master site: www.Belkin.com then Power Protection.
    Here's a direct link (I still have to learn vB Code...)
    http://catalog.belkin.com/IWCatProdu...%2Eotection%2F
    bill
     
  13. Brian Johnson

    Brian Johnson Supporting Actor

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