Basic Direct View Geometry Questions

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Michael Steven, Oct 22, 2003.

  1. Michael Steven

    Michael Steven Auditioning

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2003
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hi everyone,

    I'm new to this forum and just posted my first message in the audio/video sources section (titled: "Will a New DVD Player Solve My Problem?") regarding some issues I am having with an analog DVD to TV hookup. I have a related question about direct-view TVs.

    Please forgive me if you've heard the following questions a million times before -- I'm sort of new to home video.

    Here's what's going on: I am currently using a Panasonic 27" flat-screen TV. At this point in time, I can't make the move to HD (for reasons explained in my other post). I am somewhat pleased with the picture quality when viewing DVDs but am considering upgrading the TV to the

    Sony KV-27FV310, their top-of-the-line analog TV in that size (I can't really go beyond a 27-inch at this point). I have, however, noticed that every KV-27FV310 I have seen has some geometry problems, whether it's a tilted picture, a pincushion problem, or curved vertical and horizontal lines.

    If I purchase this TV, can most of the geometry problems be fixed simply by having a Sony technician come out and callibrate the TV? Or would I run the risk of still having some issues even after a tech fixes the TV?

    I am wondering mainly because I will only get this TV (which retails at $649 -- but I can get it new for $599) if I can be confident that most of the geometry problems are indeed fixable.

    I will say this: the KV-27FV310 has fewer geometry problems than other Sony analog TVs that I have seen.

    Anyway, any feedback would be appreciated -- I'm sort of new to home video and don't know much (yet) about resolving these types of common issues.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 1999
    Messages:
    16,738
    Likes Received:
    129
    Trophy Points:
    0
    There are two or three high def-capable 27-inch sets on the market for around $600-700 (Zenith, Samsung, and, I believe, Philips). As for the Sony WEGA, the major advantage it would have over your present set is a user menu-accessible 16:9 mode. Geometry issues are common with some Sony models, it seems. These can be fixed to some extent in the service menu, and any authorized Sony tech should be able to do this.
     
  3. Michael Steven

    Michael Steven Auditioning

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2003
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I gave some serious thought to going with one of the $600-$700 HDTV models from Zenith and Samsung ... but decided against it for what might seem to be an "odd" peace-of-mind reason: going with something like the Sony Wega model means that I would get a top-of-the-line 27 analog TV; going with the Zenith and Samsung means I get a better picture but may or may not be getting the most bang for my buck in terms of quality. Of course, I could be wrong about this (ultimately, I don't know if the Zenith and Samsung models are sub-par HDTV models), but that was my logic behind it.

    It's odd, I know -- here I am concerned about picture quality, and I rule out affordable HDTVs. The main part of my thinking is that when I do go HD, I want to do it right -- widescreen, big, and with a great sound system.

    Now, if screen geometry is easily fixable, that makes me feel better and will make me more likely to seriously consider buying the Sony. It does look pretty good.
     
  4. DaleBesh

    DaleBesh Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2002
    Messages:
    163
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I have an older 36" Wega (2001) and went through all the geometry settings that were accessible through the menu and remote. The overall improvement was noticeable.
    Make sure you have some time on the display before attempting this.
    I would not advise adjusting anything internal unless you really know what you are doing.
    There are a couple of websites that reference these adjustments, they may be out of date for later models.
    You will need to order the service manual to see how to enter the service mode, and do the various adjustments.
    I used to be quite entrenched in the process and helped out other Wega owners. But it's been a while now and my own display continues to deliver a fine picture.
    The point is there is always room for improvement, and the larger the CRT the greater the potential for noticeable error. You will never make it perfect, but you can get it closer.

    Along the same line, I have verified my calibration settings a few times, using Video Essentials. And they are still spot on. That says a lot about modern electronics.
     
  5. Michael Steven

    Michael Steven Auditioning

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2003
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    DaleBesh -- thanks. That's very helpful information. If I do buy the Sony (and return my Panasonic) and find that there are geometry problems, chances are I will ask Sony to send out a tech instead of going into the service menu myself ... I've heard about the service menus but have never used one myself and probably wouldn't go into it for fear of screwing something up.

    I will probably also purchase one of the calibration DVDs, perhaps the Video Essentials or something similar. Even though I won't be going to HD for a while, I still want my picture to be as good as possible.

    The particular Sony model I am considering (KV-27FV310) doesn't seem to have as many problems as other models ... at least based on what I've seen at several electronics stores. Having said that, I was at Circuit City the other day and noticed that even the $1200 and up Sony Wega HD 4:3 TVs (32 and 36 inch models) had noticeable geometry problems.

    On my flat screen Panasonic, I have had no need yet to adjust the tilt. The only geometry problem I have noticed so far is a slight bowing of vertical lines on the far top right side of the screen ... something so slight I can live with it.
     

Share This Page