Barry Lyndon

Discussion in 'Movies' started by Tom-G, Jan 30, 2002.

  1. Tom-G

    Tom-G Screenwriter

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    Barry Lyndon was one of the few Stanley Kubrick movies I had never seen, so I finally screened it over the weekend.

    This has to be one of the most gorgeous movies I have ever seen! By gorgeous, I mean the cinematography is breath taking. Almost every shot is grand and dazzling.

    Although it is three hours, the film is one that I sat back and enjoyed like a good book.

    Is anyone else a fan of this film?
     
  2. Peter Apruzzese

    Peter Apruzzese Producer

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    One of Kubrick's best. It's a film that continues to amaze, even on multiple viewings.
     
  3. Mike Broadman

    Mike Broadman Producer

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    I love this movie. It has this odd quality of being cute and creepy. It's like a parody of itself. Very enjoyable.
     
  4. Mikal Haydn

    Mikal Haydn Agent

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    My favourite among all of the Kubricks. Favourite scene - when the elder Lyndon son walks his step-brother into the music hall and the ensuing chaos. Another favourite is when they are in the study room.
     
  5. Richard Perris

    Richard Perris Auditioning

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    There was a rumor at the time of the film's release that the interiors were lighted with thousands of candles to give them an authentic look. Only Kubrick could get away with doing such a thing.
     
  6. andreasingo

    andreasingo Stunt Coordinator

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    To me, Barry Lyndon is a great satire of the "noble" people.

    I think the epilogue explains it all.
     
  7. Gary Tooze

    Gary Tooze Producer

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    I really enjoyed our own Bill McAlpine's review:
    CLICK HERE
    Regards,
     
  8. BarryR

    BarryR Supporting Actor

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    A film that can be rewatched endlessly. [​IMG]
     
  9. george kaplan

    george kaplan Executive Producer

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  10. Gary Tooze

    Gary Tooze Producer

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    Perhaps Billy was having a bad day... Carl Dryer in Day or Wrath, made them find a rowboat out of oak instead of what type of wood it was made of, even though it is indiscenable to the viewer...
    Tarkovsky, for The Mirror, try to plant buckwheat as that is what he remembered as a child... even though all the farmers of the area told him it wouldn't grow... he did, it grew and he filmed it...
    I think this may seperate the fine line between "cinema art" from "movies with Tony Curtis in a dress"...
     
  11. george kaplan

    george kaplan Executive Producer

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  12. Gary Tooze

    Gary Tooze Producer

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    Your statement proves my point george...

    The director knows, the actors may know... it effects the very esthetic of the scene... to degrees that only the director may distiguish... there is often much more than the perception that meets your eye...

    Regards,

    P.S. I'm having a great day... thanks !
     
  13. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Depending on my mood, Barry Lyndon sometimes clocks in at second place among my preferences from the Kubrick catalog. It is much like an eighteenth-century painting in that each frame is exquisitely composed and photographed (which is, after all, one of this director's specialties). The lighting, as has been noted, is completely natural; Mr. Kubrick used a specially developed lens to allow for shooting in candlelight and natural indoor light.

    The running time of the film is perfect for its near-epic subject matter. And the story itself remains one of the best-ever examples of picaresque literature brought to film.

    A marvelous, tour-de-force of a film. A magnificent, unforgettable accomplishment that grows richer with each screening.
     
  14. Ike

    Ike Screenwriter

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    I, too, enjoyed this film seemingly more than most. I wouldn't rank it as one of Kubrick's best, but it's still a great film.

    Wilder's quote is fine, although I'd say the lighting is more noticeable than a certain kind of wood. It irks me, but I'm easily aggitated when my tastes are teased (I still am angry about that stab at Nader on the Simpsons).

    But I'm suprised a movie maker-someone who's dealt with it-would make such a comment. I mean, lighting candles or setting the camera outside is more flexible than taking 2 hours to light a scene with huge generators. It looks softer. I certainly could tell.

    Does anyone know if the special lens has been used for any other films?
     
  15. Brook K

    Brook K Lead Actor

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    One of my favorite Kubrick's as well. Like all of his films it has marvelous depth and you can find something different to admire or pay attention to each time you watch it. The compositions are among the best ever committed to film. In Scorsese's documentary, A Personal Journey Through American Film he highlights the scene where Barry first courts Lady Lyndon, also one of my favorites, where the slow tracking shot mirrors the mannered courtship customs.
    Another favorite scene is the duel between Barry and Lord Bullingdon. "Have you received satisfaction, Lord Bullingdon?" "I have not received satisfaction."
     
  16. Kim Donald

    Kim Donald Stunt Coordinator

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    Stanly Kubrick and John Alcott used only natural light filming BL and had special lenses constructed by Zeiss for the indoor scenes by candlelight, I beleive Kubrick owned the process used for shooting the indoor scenes and has never allowed anyone else use of the lenses.

    kd
     
  17. Evan Case

    Evan Case Screenwriter

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  18. Evan Case

    Evan Case Screenwriter

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    As for Barry Lyndon, I must agree with Jack: on any given viewing this can be my second favorite Kubrick film.
    Despite the supposedly "slow" pace, I found the adventure portion of the film's first half to be as marvelously exciting as almost any action film.
    Barry's inevitable fall is as tragic as the opening is spirited, and just as good.
    The photography, as everyone has already mentioned, is impeccable (even if I had hated the plot, I would have praised the film's look).
    Kudos also, to what's-his-face's (Something Rosensomething--he scored Star Trek IV [​IMG] ) Academy Award-winning reorchestration of period music. Perhaps more than any non-2001 Kubrick film, music plays a vital role in Barry Lyndon effectively mirroring the twists of fate and emotion that young Redmond Barry must endure.
    Exceptional in every way.
    Evan
     
  19. Gary Tooze

    Gary Tooze Producer

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    Well Evan, I certainly don't define an artist ( whether in cinema or not ) as a black and white issue. He is an artist, he is not... in fact in a more broader sense, I think we may all be considered artists... to varying degrees.

    This can go back to a quite long article that I will one day finish that attempts to simply define cinema into those two categories ( crazy idea huh ? )... so Billy Wilder makes entertaining films for many people, but then again everyone is entertained by something different. I would certainly say Dryer, Tarkovsky, Bergman, Fellini et all, make films that are more thought provoking. Does that means it is more artistic... perhaps. But like I feel about Kevin Smith making judgments about Paul Thomas Anderson, if you DO believe yourself to be an artist to any degree and you are a filmmaker, then you cannot judge the methods of other artists... how they achieve their products can BE their art form in itself. I'm sure Wilder meant nothing too derogatory, just comparing methodology... interesting, but as a personal issue I understood the immense research that Kubrick would go through to "create" a film... and that creation process was important to him... meaning it was vital to the eventual product.

    Regards,
     
  20. Evan Case

    Evan Case Screenwriter

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    I hear what you're saying Gary, but I have a few comments and questions.
    I agree with you in general about the thought-provoking nature of Tarkovsky, Kubrick, etc. in comparison to most Wilder films (while also admitting that I've yet to see a single Wilder picture in ten that hasn't entertained the hell out me--intelligent entertainment too, not just lowest common demoninator-type stuff).
    However, I would offer up both Sunset Boulevard and Double Indemnity as two films overflowing with innovative, influential, and artistic cinematic ideas. These films work perfectly well on the surface level of "Ooh, look, these two are gonna kill her husband to get the insurance money," while also proving to be full of extremely dense usage and knowledge of filmmaking language. (One example: In Double Indemnity, there is not a single shot from Barbara Stanwick's perspective until the very end, when she is at last revealed to have been working towards her own ends only. Prior to that, she had always been in league with Fred MacMurray, and thus, viewed only from his perspective.)
    I disagree with your notion that no artist would demean the work of another. I don't see how you can argue this statement effectively when there have been "artists" disparaging other "artists" for centuries. Tolstoy wrote an essay damning virtually every work of accepted art save Bach and a few others. In more modern times, filmmakers like Godard have made a living out of verbally trashing others' accomplishments. Even to use your example, is PTA's wishing of testicular cancer upon David Fincher because of Fight Club exempt from criticism, simply because he made something as wonderful as Magnolia?
    I don't know. I say, if you make art, you make art. What you have to say about others should have no bearing upon how your work is perceived.
    Evan
     

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