What's new

B&W speakers and weird cables (1 Viewer)

piggydad30

Auditioning
Joined
Jan 8, 2009
Messages
5
Real Name
Marc
Greetings,

My previous owner had B & W speakers for his home theatre. He left the cables the installed cables when he left. For the Front and center speakers the cables have 2 black and 2 red bannana plugs per speaker the end of these cables are fused so the 2 black become 1 bananna plug and the two red black become 1 bananna plug for the receiver.

Is this the usual configuration for B & W speakers? They look like Hi grade wire so I would like to use them but don't have an adaptor so the 2 red and 2 black become 1 and 1 for the speaker. Does such an adaptor exist?

Thanks,
Marc
 

SethH

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Dec 17, 2003
Messages
2,867
The previous owner believed that bi-wiring was a useful thing to do. Science tells us that bi-wiring only increased the effective gauge of the attached wires.

Many speakers, including several B&W speakers, are configured for the option of bi-amping, meaning they have two sets of binding posts on the back of the speaker. If one chooses to not bi-amp you can either connect these binding posts using a metal bracket (usually included with the speaker) or through biwiring.

So out there believe there is an audible advantage to biwiring, but there really isn't science to back that up. Biamping, on the other hand, could provide benefit when done properly, but is overkill for most people.
 

Brett DiMichele

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Sep 30, 2001
Messages
3,181
Real Name
Brett
Big difference between Bi-Amp and just passive Bi-Wiring. That configuration is just passive Bi-Wiring and there is no advantage in my mind. Bi-Amping also uses Bi-Wires but they terminate at both ends with four connectors (high / Low ).

I run Bi-Amp with my own DIY Bi-Wires and it's not snake oil
htf_images_smilies_smile.gif
 

David Willow

Babbling Idiot
Senior HTF Member
Joined
Jan 23, 2004
Messages
2,555
Location
Mechanicsburg, PA
Real Name
Dave
We had this discussion. Unless you have a true external crossover, something way beyond most consumer gear, then bi-amping is snake oil.
 

Brett DiMichele

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Sep 30, 2001
Messages
3,181
Real Name
Brett
Yes we did have this discussion and I'm sorry but I still do not, nor will I ever agree with your viewpoint.. Active or Passive, you are making a broad sweeping assumption.

If we were talking about simple Bi Wiring I would without hesitation concur with you. There is no snake oil involved with sending two separate channels of an amp to two separated sections of a crossover network.

Depending on how the processor is sending signals to the crossover network, you could double the amount of power going to the speakers. I do agree (and we had this discussion) if you are sending two separate full range signals through passive networks, those networks by nature will filter out the wide band signal, some of the power will be shed in heat. But if the source equipment has adjustable internal active networks, you then can match the active and passive networks and the signal going to each side of the passive network will indeed be the full RMS output of the amp section (when needed).

Again, there is a real world difference between Bi Amped and Non Bi Amped in my configuration and mine is no different than ANY true pair of near/full range floor standing mains which can make use of Bi Amplification.

I will not address you further in this discussion, both of our opinions have now been heard.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Latest Articles

Forum statistics

Threads
356,512
Messages
5,114,616
Members
144,104
Latest member
Righ
Recent bookmarks
0
Top