AVIA calibration question

Discussion in 'Displays' started by JimU, Aug 15, 2005.

  1. JimU

    JimU Auditioning

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    I currently have a Mitsubishi WS-65809 65" rear projection TV that I purchased three years ago.

    I ordered the AVIA DVD today and will be calibrating my TV when the DVD arrives. The way that our TV is setup is that there is a separate input source (selectable via the TV remote) for cable TV and DVD viewing (e.g. Input 1 is cable TV, input 2 is DVD, etc.). In order to watch a DVD, I have to select input 2 on the TV.

    When I run the AVIA calibration, I will have the TV setup to use input 2. I believe that the TV keeps separate settings (color, tint, etc.) for each input source. I'm assuming, therefore, that once I get the calibration setup properly with the Avia DVD that I will have to go to the other input sources and configure the same settings.

    Does this make sense? This is my first post here, so hopefully I don't sound like too much of a newbie? I want to calibrate the TV soon, because I believe I have some burn-in on it. The other night I put had a DVD in and when it got to the main menu screen, which had a white background, I noticed a faint image of the Food Network logo (my wife watches this channel a lot) in the lower right hand corner.

    The logo isn't normally visible, so hopefully I've caught this in time and can prevent further burn-in by calibrating the TV (and especially lowering the contrast).
     
  2. Paul Padilla

    Paul Padilla Supporting Actor

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    Ideally yes...connect your DVD player to each input you use, preferably using the same connection type as the device that is normally connected to it. So if your DVD player is using component cables on input 2...go with that. Then, if your TV or cable input is using S-video on input...let's say 1, connect the DVD to that same S-video input to run the calibration.

    Since you've had the screen for 3 years already you could be in for a shock at what "calibrated" looks like. Hopefully you've had brightness and contrast at 50% or lower and there's no damage. Believe the Avia guy when he says the new settings might seem soft. After a few weeks you'll start noticing how out of whack other people's sets are. (avoid the temptation to nag them about it [​IMG] They'll just tell you that TV settings are a matter of taste anyway)
     
  3. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    Yes, follow the instructions and the test patterns closely, you'll end up with a drastically different picture than you have now. Remember to set your white level as LOW as possible before it starts to look gray, this is going to be a LOT lower than you are used to. Spend time with the settings, most people have no idea what a calibrated display looks like, it will take time to adjust, but trust me you won't go back to your older settings you'll laugh at just how bad they were.
     
  4. JimU

    JimU Auditioning

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    Thanks for the input guys. I'm looking forward to seeing what I've been missing... [​IMG]

    One of the features that this TV has is a setting called "IRIS", which stands for Intelligent Room Illumination Sensor. According to the manual, "when IRIS is on, the TV automatically adjusts contrast and brightness for best quality."

    If the room is dark and your suddenly turn on the lights, you can see the TV make the picture brighter. In this mode, contrast and brightness cannot be adjusted manually. If you turn the mode off, the contrast and brightness sliders are then accessible. Once I calibrate the TV, I should leave this setting off (to prevent it from overriding my settings)?

    Paul - Rather than moving cables around once I calibrate the DVD input, I'm assuming that I could just write down the settings I make (e.g. contrast is 4 notches to the left of center, brightness is 1 notch to the right, etc.) and just configure the other TV inputs the same way. Does that make sense?
     
  5. Paul Padilla

    Paul Padilla Supporting Actor

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    It wouldn't hurt to try that, but if you haven't found this already...HT people can be a little neurotic. [​IMG]

    All the same, different connections (S-video vs. Component, etc.) frequently use different processing inside the TV, so rubber stamping the settings from one input to the next won't necessarily get you the best results but it might get you close. I suppose that if you happen to be using the same connection across the board, then you might be OK. But beware the insideous home theater bug...once you really start looking for differences....you just might find them. [​IMG]
     
  6. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    definitely leave your auto-adjust feature off.
     
  7. JimU

    JimU Auditioning

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    More newbie questions before I calibrate:

    1. There is a color temp setting in the TV menu. Here are the options (quoted from the manual):

    a. Low 6500K or Low (for DTV): White images will have a warm cast to them. The Low 6500K represents the 6500K industry standard for NTSC (non-DTV) pictures.

    b. Medium: White images will be balanced between the Low (warm) and High (cool) settings.

    c. High: White images will have a cool cast to them. This setting may provide the most realistic picture under bright lighting.

    Any thoughts on the best setting to use? We currently have analog cable, but I want to upgrade soon to get digital cable (and the HDTV package) that our cable company offers.

    2. There is a "Black Enhancement" option. According to the manual with this feature on, "the contrast in dark scenes is enhanced for better picture quality. Brighter scenes will not be effected". Any thoughts on whether this should be on or off?

    3. Video display - There are two settings for this - 480p or 960i. Again, we have standard cable now but I want to get digital cable soon. Can I get your thoughts on the best setting here?

    Even after having the TV for 3 years, I'm still trying to understand everything about it. Thanks for all your help and being patient with me..... [​IMG]
     
  8. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    Use low color temperatrue as that will be the closest to the correct 6500K temp. It will still be off i'm sure, but it's the closest.

    Anything that says "enhance" anywhere is usually a bad thing, leave black enhancement off. Don't know what it's trying to do in your display, but there's no need for it. It may try to vary the black level based on APL, if it does this then definitely leave it off!
     
  9. Adil M

    Adil M Supporting Actor

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    1st leave your set on for ~15 minutes.
    Low and Medium both look good (low is preferred.)
    Turn IRIS off.
    Turn Black Enhancement off.
    In order to turn off SVM, you have to get in the service menu. If you are unfamiliar w/ that term ignore it for now.
    Pay attention to the AVIA "basic video setup" part before calibrating.
    You can also do a convergence and advanced convergence from the menu if you are patient enough.

    BTW, your set is notorious for "Red Push." This means people have a overly reddish tone to their skin. Black people look more orange. This can be fixed by an adapter from RadiShack or by an I2C fix by an ISF guy. This is food for thought for later.

    Good Luck.
     
  10. JimU

    JimU Auditioning

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    I've been doing lots of reading today about red push and attenuators, etc. Now, if I were to get an attenuator, I would only be able to connect it to the red component cable for my DVD player, right?

    Regular cable TV would still be affected by the red push. Is that true? If that's the case, then my AVIA calibration settings on the DVD input (which has the attenuator) would be different than the calibration for the cable TV input (without the attenuator), right?

    If that's true, then I might have to run the calibration twice, once with the attenuator off (to get the settings for cable TV) and once with the attenuator on (to get settings for the DVD player).

    Finally, which side does the attenuator plug into, the TV side or the DVD player (or AV receiver) side?
     
  11. Adil M

    Adil M Supporting Actor

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    Right.
    It doesn't matter which side.
     
  12. JimU

    JimU Auditioning

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    Thanks. I was poking around the Home Theater Spot Mitsubishi forums yesterday and found a post from a few years ago listing the code to access the service menu and the specific menu item for SVM.

    I ALSO found the paragraph in the back of my owners manual that warns me in big bold letters NOT to access menus not covered by the manual (i.e. the service menu) and states that "non-authorized changes and changes made by non-authorized persons may void all or part of the warranty".

    I nervously accessed the service menu and waited for the TV to explode since I'm a "non-authorized" person. Surprisingly, nothing happened and the service menu appeared.

    I pressed the Video button on the remote until the SVM setting appeared. I noticed that the current setting is "2", with the following being the possible settings:

    0 = off
    1 = low
    2 = medium
    3 = high

    I cancelled out of the menu without making any changes (that exploding TV image kept popping up in my head). The screen did flash for a second and I ducked for cover, but when I looked up, everything was normal.

    If (and I say IF) I were to change the SVM setting, should I make the change for all inputs (DVD, cable TV, etc.)? Does SVM actually help in certain cases (e.g. it makes things better for analog cable signals, but hinders DVD output, which has much better quality)?

    Should I gradually change this setting (i.e. set it to "1" leave it there for a while to get used to it and then later set it to "0")?

    I'm also assuming that I would have to change SVM for each input individually (e.g. select DVD input, enter service menu, change SVM, save changes, exit menu, select cable TV input and repeat). Is this correct?

    I tend to be very conservative with these types of things especially after spending thousands of dollars on our home theater system. The last thing I'd want to have to do is look my wife (and kids) in the face and tell them that I destroyed the TV by doing some tweaking... [​IMG]
     
  13. Michael TLV

    Michael TLV THX Video Instructor/Calibrator

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    Greetings

    It's by scan rate (if that) ... and has nothing to do with inputs.

    There might be memories for 480i ... p ... 1080i ... that would be it.

    Why would artificial edges be good for anyone that cared about image quality? What do you think is behind the artificial components of the image? (Something called real image detail.)

    SVM is appropriate from a marketing perspective at high contrast settings. If you torch mode the set ... you might need SVM.

    Regards
     
  14. JimU

    JimU Auditioning

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    Thanks Michael. So basically what you're saying is that there is no need for SVM whatsoever in a true home viewing environment?
     
  15. Michael TLV

    Michael TLV THX Video Instructor/Calibrator

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    Greetings

    That is correct. It is there to "fix" what high contrast settings do to the image.

    High contrast makes the picture bloom ... real edges soften ... = bad image.

    Add artificial edging to image ... to make image integrity look like it is still there when it isn't.

    At optimal contrast levels ... real edges compete with artificial edges ... which = bad thing.

    Regards
     

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