AV input into PC

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Grant B, Feb 11, 2002.

  1. Grant B

    Grant B Producer

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    Got a new sony PC which has a DVD burner. It has no AV inputs and I would like to burn some old video tapes and lds onto dvd. Anyone know of any good products that will do that?

    It has an ilink input (which I believe is the same as firewire???);if that helps
     
  2. Hugh M

    Hugh M Second Unit

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    yeah, if you have a spare PCI slot, get an IO Magic PC PVR card from compusa for $20-$40. this is really only worth the hassle if you use svideo connections (IMO)...

    then all of your capturing/encoding/editing software is freeware, and there is a whole world of help available for you on that. The only thing you will need is a dvd authoring program, which it sounds like you already have. but U-lead is one of those as well.

    do a search here for IO Magic and see what comes up. (besides me)
     
  3. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

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    If you have firewire already you can get a Hollywood DV Bridge or a Sony Media converter ($250) and run DV
     
  4. Grant B

    Grant B Producer

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    THANKS !

    $30 sounds better than $250 unless it would do it faster...but it would be realtime anyways..
     
  5. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

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    If you're looking at making anything that looks even halfway decent, $30 is not going to cut it. If you're just screwing around with a webcam, $30 will do it for you.
     
  6. Chris T. Kennedy

    Chris T. Kennedy Stunt Coordinator

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    I don't know how cheap ($30??) TV cards are today, but they are pretty affordable. I picked up an Avermedia TV/FM98 Stereo a couple of years ago and use it all the time. At that point, it was $100 on sale for around $80-$90. (Forgot)

    They have a newer version out now that has a few more bells and whistles. (MPEG encoding on the fly, etc...)

    Anyway - it has coaxial, RCA, S-Video, and FM antenna inputs on it as well as stereo mini-phono passthrough. (2 jacks)

    If you are recording off of VHS tapes and Laserdiscs, you are recording off analog mediums so you don't need anything fancy to carry the info over. Just make sure you use shielded cables.

    For recording, a nice program to use is VirtualDub. It is currently freeware. For encoding you may want to check out tmpgenc (I mostly do vcds, but I believe this can do High quality DVD Mpeg as well. That aspect may have a time limit on it however)

    Good luck,

    Chris
     
  7. Hugh M

    Hugh M Second Unit

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  8. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

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    I've had plenty of experience with these cheap capture cards. they look terrible. If he wants to burn to DVD they will NOT do the job and he'll be lucky to achieve VCD quality. As someone who has been doing NLE editing since 1998, I've had a lot of experience with cards with dedicated hardware compression chips on them, and those could not achieve decent quality w/o a RAID array attached. All those cheapo cards are doing is overlaying the signal into your VGA stream, and Virtaldub or whatever is capturing that overlay (not at the full framerate!)

    He said he had no A/V inputs on the computer, and made no mention of a digital camcorder, so I assumed he'd rather spend $250 for an analog/digital converter box than to go out and buy a camcorder at $800+.
     
  9. Chris T. Kennedy

    Chris T. Kennedy Stunt Coordinator

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    As in....28.612 fps instead of 29.97? Honestly...the frame rate is fine. So long as your hard drive is of decent speed, it shouldn't be a problem. You will need quite a bit of hard drive space though.

    Default software that usually comes with a video card is gonna probably give you half the frame rate you specify (which would be my guess as to the quality the Jeff mentioned that he has seen - it sucks.) Virtualdub does a great job with capturing the proper amount of frames as well as breaking the AVI file size barrier.

    You also need to make sure that you aren't capturing on FAT, FAT32, etc....Run NTFS so you don't have to deal with the maximum file size of 4GB.

    Basically, more than the price...you need to pay attention to the chipset used on the card to do the capturing and check that out.

    Looks like this thread has given a ton of information so far. Good luck!
     
  10. Hugh M

    Hugh M Second Unit

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    the source is low resolution so it shouldn't matter what it is when it gets to the pc. take a vhs tapeon a vcr and send it through svideo to the computer, then you capture at full frame and aftwerwards do post-processing to try and improve the image before burning.
    not all $30 capture cards are the same. the io magic card I am using has ~zero noise~ on the svideo capture.
    I'm sure that spending more money makes it easier, but I'm not sure about better. if you get some nice software with it, and it makes things easier then its worth the extra money in my book. I have never used the pinnacle products or an AD converter, so without making a fool out of myself, I'll just recommend that one try the $30 product first. and read up about encoding/capturing/post-processing on sites like www.vcdhelp.com
     
  11. Grant B

    Grant B Producer

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    Thanks everyone! A lot of info I neeed to siff through.

    I don't have a camcoder BTW and the computer is one of the better one sony sells

    100Gigs HD,2.0Ghz & 456Megs Ram...if that helps

    Thanks again
     
  12. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

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    Buzz, I don't have a 16:9 monitor, but yes, it supports output of anamorphic widescreen. I have yet to try it, but I plan to eventually [​IMG]
    Of course, it's your money, and your computer. But I promise you that if it's TRUE archiving you're going after, and quality you're looking for, a $30 card won't do it for you.
    The more limited your source (VHS for example), the more info it takes to get it as best as it can get. The PCI bus itself isn't that limiting, except when it's attached to a graphic's card, because it has to deal with the card's traffic as well as the video data, and that's not going to fly.
    Maybe Sony has some sort of deal for Sony computer owners on their media converter. I bet it wouldn't hurt to call and ask.
     
  13. Jacques

    Jacques Extra

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    Jeff,
    I looked at the specs on that Hollywood DV Bridge; I see options less expensive and more expensive, and I'm wondering... is this the optimal point in price vs. performance? I'm seriously considering building my next PC around video-editing and archiving, and while I wouldn't want to spend an outrageous amount of money, I would not want to cut too many corners on quality. Any recommendations on sites and forums dedicated to this? I just have a ton of questions. [​IMG]
     
  14. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

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    http://www.dv.com/community/ is a forum for pros and semi-pros/hobbyists.
    They'll tell you to get much more expensive things [​IMG]
    Basically, with the setup you have, and if you're looking to make DVDs, you really want to go DV for your editing. The cheaper solutions will not do nearly as well. The DV Bridge will provide you with a hardware DV codec, and analog input and output for DV.
    The other beautiful part about the bridge is that you don't need to worry about drivers or anything. Just have a firewire port on your machine and you're gold.
     
  15. Jacques

    Jacques Extra

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    Thanks for the link, the boards there seem to be good resource, after a quick glance. As a complete newbie, I'm seeing a lot of options, some for a great deal of money; I guess I'm still wondering if there's a point where price doesn't yield much more performance than the next option down? Looks like more research is in order. [​IMG]
     
  16. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

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    Well, it all depends on what you're doing.
    With video transcoders, more expensive is always better. How much better you percieve it is another story. For your average user, the DV bridges or going through a DV camcorder should be fine. If you're going pro, hey, they're still good [​IMG]
    Let me put it this way. I'm subtitling Japanese DVDs, transcoding to DV and going back out. It looks 99% identical to the source [​IMG]
     
  17. Ken Chan

    Ken Chan Producer

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    Jeff,

     
  18. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

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    Personally, I think SCSI drives are a waste of money for this purpose. UDMA 100 drives do just peachy on DV, especially back then, SCSI drives are just too expensive for the negligable performance gain these days. 4 years ago I would have agreed with you.

    The DC30 was a good card for it's time, basically low-end pro gear. Unless you're running a pro shop, there's really no need to run analog capture boards, it's just not worth the hassle and extra overhead. DV converters look fantastic

    As for the color modes, I frankly haven't had a problem when converting to MPEG-2 for burning to DVD. The footage still looks great, so I don't think you really need to worry about it.

    One thing I don't think I've mentioned, but the DV bridges make another handy thing easy. You can easily hook up an NTSC monitor to your computer this way. NTSC footage naturally looks pretty washed out on a computer screen, this is normal, so if you're doing color correction, titleing or whatever, it's great to have a monitor (little TV, I use an old commodore monitor) next to you (don't forget to calibrate it!) for reference.
     
  19. Jacques

    Jacques Extra

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    Jeff, so, how would you quantify the difference in performance between the Hollywood DV Bridge and the Pinnacle DV500 Plus?
    Are there any specific kinds of video and sound cards recommended for video editing? Also, if one were to go with a solution such as the Hollywood DV Bridge or Pinnacle DV500 Plus, are there any optimal specs to look for in buying the firewire card with which they interface into the PC (assuming one isn't included?)?
    Someone I was talking about this to mentioned the idea of a dual processor setup... any thoughts on that?
    Thanks. [​IMG]
     
  20. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

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    Dual processor will help only in the production stage (rendering and such). The 500+ gives you a good firewire setup and codec in 1 package, along with Premiere 6.0.

    Since Grant hasa a Sony machine, they have a good firewire card built in already, and I believe Sony includes their own DV codec which is much better than the stock Microsoft one (there IS a difference!) then all he needs is the DV Bridge.

    Basically, it's a case of you get what you pay for. Personally I have a Pinnacle DV 200 card, which is basically the 500 w/o the onboard codec and analog in/outs. (I use my camcorder for the DV Bridge/Analog function)

    With DV, like with so many things, you get what you pay for. I wouldn't touch one of those Pyro DV cards, or any of the other cheapy items with a 10 foot pole. For codec boxes, it's preferable to have one with the Sony I-Link chipset in it, since it's the best and what's been standardized on for the most part.
     

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