Automobiles and anti-freeze

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Gary Seven, Mar 19, 2004.

  1. Gary Seven

    Gary Seven Grand Poo Pah

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    Hello All,

    Perhaps some of you are in the know.

    Many years ago I used to work with A/C units and one I would sometines come across was a system that used pure anit-freeze. The technician at the time said to me when I asked why cars don't use pure anti-freeze, "no reason not to. In fact, pure anti-freeze is the way to go since it is the water that causes the rust and corrosion in coolant systems." I went to the mechanic the other day since i noticed rust color in my anti-freeze and asked if they could put pure anti-freeze in. The mechanic then spouted a spiel on how it is not recommended and you could over heat your car more easily, blah blah blah. It really didn't make sense to me since the boiling point of anti-freeze is higher than water (or is it?)

    What is your knowledge on this subject. Can someone provide the defintitive answer?
     
  2. Shawn C

    Shawn C Screenwriter

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    http://www.peakantifreeze.com/faq.html#A

    A. Why is it important to mix antifreeze with water?
    Antifreeze contains chemicals that protect your engine against rust and corrosion, as well as freeze-up and boil over protection. Water is required to activate the chemicals in the inhibitor package. Furthermore, adding water to antifreeze actually increases the freeze-up and boil over protection provided. For example, a mix of 40% antifreeze and 60% water provides freeze-up protection down to -10°F and boil over protection up to 259°F. In comparison, a mix of 70% antifreeze and 30% water provides freeze-up protection down to -62°F and boil over protection up to 270°F. However, we do not recommend adding more than 70% antifreeze. This would limit the corrosion and freeze up protection and heat transfer capabilities of the antifreeze.
     
  3. Gary Seven

    Gary Seven Grand Poo Pah

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    I see. Thanks Shawn. I guess the mechanic was correct. Not sure I can always trust those guys, but this one I apparently can.

    Nice link BTW.
     
  4. Jay H

    Jay H Producer

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    I used a 50/50 mix the last time I did a coolant change. I was also told to use distilled water and not just tap water...

    Jay
     
  5. Michael Varacin

    Michael Varacin Stunt Coordinator

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    The main reason that water is required is becuase the ethylene glycol (Anti-freeze) does not have the same heat capacity as water. Also known at the specific heat value. Meaning that water can absorb more of the heat from the engine then the glycol can. If you used pure glycol, your whole cooling system would be less efficient.

    Water is one of the best substances for absorbing heat. The glycol is just added to shift the freezing and boiling points.
     

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