Auric Illuminator?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Kevin C Brown, Feb 8, 2002.

  1. Kevin C Brown

    Kevin C Brown Producer

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    I guess we'll see if this is OK by the forum rules or not! [​IMG]
    My opinion is, that most tweaks are harmless, and some may actually help.
    (Heck, I have a very expensive balanced power AC unit that some people may consider a tweak, but I think could be considered as absolutely necessary for "clean" audio and video reproduction...)
    But some tweaks may have hidden potential dangers.
    I put the Auric Illuminator in this catagory.
    Two parts to this product:
    1) Black pen to coat the inside and outside edges of the DVD or CD, and
    2) The gel that gets applied to the bottom or read surface of a CD or DVD.
    ** The following is my opinion, and you can flame if you want, but I'm just tellin' ya what I think... [​IMG]
    As for the pen, I thought that the "green" pens used for CDs in the early 90's, had been thoroughly debunked by the mainstream press. With data and measurements and listening tests.
    Doesn't matter anyway, because I don't consider the black pen as being able to do anything bad to the discs or player.
    The issue is with the gel.
    The gel gets applied to the optical surface of the disc.
    1) CDs and DVDs are made in a clean room. But, you would apply the gel in your house or apt. Definately not a clean room. So, while the substance is being applied to the surface of the disc, you are also incorporating dust, dead human skin cells, dander from any nearby cat or dog or rabbit or whatever [​IMG] to the surface of the disc. Not good in my opinion.
    Plus, I don't really think you could get as uniform a layer by hand as you'd need or want as say, in a piece of equipment actually used in one of those clean rooms to make a disc (spin coater, sputterer, PECVD machine, etc).
    2) CDs and DVDs are read with lasers. Laser light contains energy. The light travels through the polycarbonate layer, which is mostly transparent (but some of the energy from the light does get absorbed into the plastic), to hit the back Al (or Au) metal surface where it gets mostly reflected (with some absorption), and then travels back out of the polycarb again. Then, the detector looks for differences in the amplitude of the reflected laser light from the pits and plateaus (valleys and peaks, "lands" and "mesas") inscribed on the metallic layer.
    So, since there is heat input into the disc from the laser, then there can be localized heating which can result in the gel substance being evaporated from the surface of the disc. All over the inside of your player.
    There is also the fact, as someone pointed out on another forum, that gee, I can point a pocket pen-light laser pointer at a piece of paper all day, and not see a temperature difference. Well, I would say that 1st, did you put a thermocouple at the point where the laser is hitting the paper and actually try to measure any temp increase? And then 2nd, that a CD/DVD player laser is focussed to alot smaller spot size (microns vs mm) and that there will definately be differences in heat generation and retention based on that too. (I.e., the heat flux, heat per unit area, is a lot higher.)
    All has to do with stuff like Planck's constant, the speed of light, the wavelength of light, and such as that. [​IMG]
    You can certainly argue about the *amount* of energy that's input into a disc from a laser, but you cannot argue that there is, and in fact, *has* to be an amount period.
    Plus the fact that in general, a semiconductor laser in a CD/DVD player is made to alot more exacting standards and quality than a pen-light laser pointer with a key chain attached to it run by a couple of AA batteries. (Things like the Si crystal quality, recombination-generation sites within the band gap, efficiency, the quality of the wave guide, etc.)
    Although there are certainly portable DVD/CD players powered by batteries! [​IMG]
    I would never ever say that dang, you treat one disc with the gel, and wham-o, your player is now trashed. I'm talking about many discs played over time.
    And, there are obviously other heat sources inside a player too: the power supply, the motor to turn the CD/DVD, the electronics themselves, etc. (Ever see the big honkin' heat sinks attached to a Pentium or PowerPC/G3/G4 microprocessor? Those things give off heat like you wouldn't believe! There are also obviously ICs in DVD/CD players too.)
    Plus, some people like to stack components above and below their DVD/CD players: just another source of heat that could eventually get to a disc in a player.
    And, a personal observation: I just entered the 90's and got my 1st PC (and now, standalone) CD burners. [​IMG] I play a std DVD or CD in my DVD player. No biggie. Disc comes out room temp. But I play a CD-R, and the disc is noticeably warmer when it comes out of my player. Hmmm... So must be that the reflective properties of a CD-R are enough different that the heat from the laser, internals, etc, are such that it simply gets warmer.
    And, as a lot of us know, most DVD/CD players enclosures are made out of plastic. Plastic is a notoriously bad conductor of heat (and electricity, btw; same cause: it's an insulator), so once the heat is inside a player not much of a chance of it going away except through the tiny vent holes on the top or bottom of a player.
    And, this is heresay I know: I have *heard* that if you treat either SACD or DVD-A discs with this stuff, that the discs become unplayable. Now, me, myself, and I: I would think that if Auric Illuminator isn't good for SACD or DVD-A, probably not good for CDs or DVDs either.
    Now, I'm not saying that Auric Illuminator is definately bad stuff and that you should avoid it like the plague. What I'm trying to point out, is that in my mind, there are enough reasons that there could be problems with the stuff that you might not want to risk it.
    I wouldn't anyway...
    I would take the $40 for this stuff and buy and enjoy a couple more CDs and/or DVDs. [​IMG]
     
  2. RicP

    RicP Screenwriter

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    A World of misinformation in Kevin's ignominious post.
    I've actually been an Auric Illuminator user for 2 years so I'm more than qualified to speak on this topic. I will try to address some of the incorrect information that Kevin has presented.
    Well you did a horrible job. Nothing you stated had any basis in fact or in truth. You invented a problem that doesn't even exist, you misconstrued something that you heard, and applied it incorrectly to form another invalid hypothesis. You really should abjure from anymore of these posts until you are better prepared.
    Have you ever even used Auric Iluminator? Wait, here's a better question...have you ever even seen Auric Illuminator up close? Held it in your hands? I can't think of someone more unqualified to "warn" people of the "hidden potential dangers" of Auric Illumintor than you.
    I've been using it on CDs for 2 years with absolutely zero ill effects. Some of those discs I've played hundreds of times, some I've even treated twice! They still play perfectly in every single CD and/or DVD player I've ever tried them in.
    Next time you attempt to "warn" people about something, it might be prudent to ensure that your fears are not simply chimerical and that you're better prepared with things like actual facts. Also, it would be helpful if you'd actually tried the product first hand and not relied on 3rd party hearsay that you didn't even interpret correctly. So I think it's pretty safe to say that your "hidden potential dangers" are merely figments of your imagination and have absolutely no basis in reality.
    You'll notice by the way, that not once did I ever refer to what affect Auric Illuminator had on the sound of the CDs.
     
  3. Kevin C Brown

    Kevin C Brown Producer

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    Hey Ric- What part of "localized heating" don't you understand? [​IMG]
    *That's* why a normal CD can come out at room temperature but still have problems with heating where the laser hits the back reflective metal.
    All I was trying to prove with the CD-R example, is that it is a fact that there is heat input into DVDs/CDs by the laser and other internal sources in a player. Just that us big and clumsy humans don't see it as much on our macroscopic scale as compared to the microscopic scale the laser operates on in terms of reading the "lands and mesas". (Learned that term from the cdrfaq.org site, and the CD-R primer on mrichter.com! [​IMG] )
    And, you missed the part of heat input per unit area. Bottom line: a CD/DVD laser puts a lot more heat into a much smaller area than your laser pointer.
    Hmmm. Blue Oyster Cult was one of the 1st rock bands to use lasers in concert way back in the 70's. That was then made against the law. Know why? Because they found out that lasers (admittedly of that high power) could burn out the rods and cones in the back of your retina.
    And you completely ignore the other heat sources inside a player.
    And, do you know what partial pressure is? That's why it wouldn't take that much of a localized temperature increase to actually start evaporating the material off the surface of the disc.
    And it's not even that any of the above actually takes place. But you cannot prove that it doesn't. And you can't prove that it's not possible. Many discs. Over time. And that for me, is enough reason not to try the stuff even in spite of any improvements in sound or video quality that may result.
    I would like to continue discussing this constructively with you, but doesn't look like that's going to happen. [​IMG]
     
  4. Parker Clack

    Parker Clack Schizophrenic Man
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    I am going to ask a silly question here but I needed some clarification. If a CD/DVD/LD laser does not heat up the surface of the disc then why does it come out warm to the touch?

    Parker
     
  5. RicP

    RicP Screenwriter

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    It wont hppen because you haven't leg to stand on. Come back with some hard data to back up your apocryphal postulation, if you can't do that, then at least admit that you haven't a clue as to what you're talking about.
    BTW, take a look at this...
    http://www.1388.com/columnists/jon_faq_cdplayer.htm#10
     
  6. Parker Clack

    Parker Clack Schizophrenic Man
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    Ric:

     
  7. RicP

    RicP Screenwriter

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    Ok Parker. I've substituted "HAT" for "ASS". My Sincere Apologies.
     
  8. Brian OK

    Brian OK Supporting Actor

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    Parker,

    The "heat" of a played disc, however slight, can in all liklihood be attributed to the physical laws of nature unfolding all the while your disc was spinning ( very, very fast, BTW)

    Drive gear, pulley gear, deceleration gear, all tied to your players Spindle Motor unit. Essentially, you have a unit that works like hell to spin that disc at a consistent rate of speed.

    The results of this energy is friction/vibration turned to energy ... i.e. HEAT energy.

    At least that is how I look at it.

    BOK

    PS-- I have also used AI (Auric) for well over a year and I am a supporter of this tweak. YMMV. And no haz-mat team has ever made a trip to the house to rescue me and the family ;^)
     
  9. Kevin C Brown

    Kevin C Brown Producer

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    Another example for Ric:
    I can expose a piece of paper to the sun for say, 90 or 100 hrs, and nothing happens, right?
    But I use a 10 cent magnifying glass to focus that light, and bam, the paper bursts into flame at the spot where the light is focussed.
    *That* is localized heating.
    Know what the spontaneous combustion temperature of paper is? 451 deg F. (It's the title of a famous book and movie too.)
    And... Let me reiterate: many discs. Over time. *That's* why polycarb isn't affected.
    Dang, I just opened up a new batch of Fuji CD-R's. Right there on the label it says:
     
  10. RicP

    RicP Screenwriter

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    Kevin, you are 100% incorrect but you seem to be having a hard time accepting it.
    Of course you do realize that CD-Rs are not CDs right? Well, then again, maybe you don't. Perhaps while you're researching lasers, you can look up the difference between "Redbook" and "Yellowbook/Orangebook" standards and how they apply to Compact Disc technology. Perhaps also you can try to understand that while CD-Rs are burned to create their pit structure, CDs are in fact stamped and are therefore completely different in their construction.
    I think the next step here is for you to walk away before you make any more nonsensical comments or specious analogies. You are not making your original flawed hypothesis any more logical, and in fact, are having exactly the opposite effect with every irrelevant comparison you attempt to construct.
    You've provided no facts to back up your assumption, nor have you even attempted to educate yourself on the topic at hand. I am considering this discussion over unless you can bring something a little more substantial to the table than assumptions and illogical analogies.
     

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