Audiorevolution.com reports lower CD prices.

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by KeithH, Jun 24, 2002.

  1. KeithH

    KeithH Lead Actor

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    I am on the e-mail list for audiorevolution.com, and this week's mailing had a link to an article on cheaper CD prices. Here is the link:
    http://www.audiorevolution.com/news/...cdprices.shtml
    The article provides practically no concrete examples of lower prices, but I have seen low prices lately. A couple weeks ago, Best Buy had the remastered version of Meat Loaf Bat Out of Hell for $5.99 with no other purchase necessary. Also, I picked up the new greatest hits CD of Christopher Cross (Warner/Rhino) and Poison Poison's Greatest Hits 1986-1996 at Best Buy a couple weeks back for $7.99 each.
    Wal*Mart recently had several greatest hits CDs, including Madonna The Immaculate Collection and newer Warner compilations of The Doobie Brothers, The Doors, and Prince, for $9.88 each. Finally, I saw some quality classic rock CDs on sale at Sam Goody for $9.99 each about three weeks ago. I couldn't remember ever seeing CDs that cheap at Sam Goody before. Perhaps things are changing for the better.
    Getting back to the article, I liked the following line towards the end:
     
  2. Robert_eb

    Robert_eb Supporting Actor

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    It seems to be the complete opposite for newer releases. They all go for $14.99-$18.99 which to me is high, condidering DVD audio discs are only 1-3 dollars more. I thought there was a Justice Dept. investigation into the pricing of cd's but haven't heard anything concrete if that was indeed the case.
     
  3. Paul_Medenwaldt

    Paul_Medenwaldt Supporting Actor

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    There is so much I could say on the subject of record companies and artists, but i'm not an expert either.

    What most people don't know about the record industry and its artits's, is that it mirror's very similair to the movie industry and the movie theaters.

    When a record company signs an artist, the percentage of the money it will make off the first album of that artist is large, for example 70/30 with the artist getting 30% of sales. When that band releases other albums after that the share the artist gets from those albums increases. Just like movies, a movie studio will make the majority of its money the first week of release. After that weekend the movie theaters start getting a larger share of the ticket price.

    There then there is no incentive for the record company to push an already established artist if it's profit margin is decreasing. It relies more on word of mouth for the album to sell then actually advertising the product.

    Also back in the 60s and early 70s bands were putting 2 to 3 albums a year, ie: The Beach Boys, Kiss are a few I can think of right now. There was not a 2 to 3 year gap between album releases and no time for record companies to push other artists that may of been similar to that band.

    What happens now is that if a band hits it big with an album they release a couple songs, tour and by the time that is done and they get back in the studio a few years have gone by and during that time, its own record companies as well as others have copied what made that band successful and replicated it many times and by the time that band releases its 2nd album, the buying public has either moved on to other artists or has gotten tired of hearing the same thing over and over again on the raido ie: britney spears, jessica simpson, christina aguilera, mandy moore.

    Paul
     

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