Audio dropouts: are these usually due to the discs, the player, or the receiver?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Duane H, Jan 20, 2002.

  1. Duane H

    Duane H Agent

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    I have a Panasonic DVD-RV80 DVD player and Outlaw 1050 receiver. Several of my DVD's exhibit multiple brief audio dropouts. Is one of the links in the chain more likely to be at fault than the others? When the culprit is discovered, what recourse is there and how successful has pursuing this been? Thanks.
     
  2. jason celaya

    jason celaya Stunt Coordinator

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    I think if its at the same spots on the disc its more than likely the dvd player or disc. If not maybe the reciever.
     
  3. Jason Wolters

    Jason Wolters Stunt Coordinator

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    Duane,
    This topic has been heavily debated on this forum recently. Search for audio dropouts.
    Most will tell you that it is the fault of the DVD. With that said, the problems only show up on a few of the different receivers. Outlaw and Onkyo are the two most often mentioned. Many people get really irritable when you try and tell them their Onkyo has a problem.
    You can interpret this however you wish, but many Outlaw receviers have problems with audio drop outs. I expect there are many that don't, but I am not for sure. I have a Kenwood VR 507. It has never had a drop out.
    I would put the heat on the receiver manufacturer although they may be technically correct that it is not their fault, they are in a tough position when most receiver manufacturers don't share the problem. [​IMG]
     
  4. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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    The disc is the least likely culprit. If only the sound drops out but the picture is OK, it would have to be a defect common to all copies of the disc. With any popular title, there'd be threads about such a problem at HTF or comments at one or more of the review sites. But the easiest way to be sure is to take the disc to a store and use it to test-drive one of their setups.

    Once you've eliminated the disc, it gets a lot trickier. In the early days of DVD players, there were many quirks in the firmware that caused similar problems and required a chip upgrade. These days, it's more likely to be an incompatibility between a particular brand of player and a particular brand of receiver. Your best bet is to keep posting inquiries hear and in other forums where fellow owners hang out. Good luck!

    M.
     
  5. JonathanJ

    JonathanJ Auditioning

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    I had a Harman Kardon AVR45 with a low model Sonday DVD player and the audio drop-outs did occur. It was noticeable when navigating through the DVD menu, but it really didn't annoy me that much. However when i listened to music through the DVD player the drop-outs would cut off the first couple seconds of the song, which really bothered me. Now I upgraded to a Marantz Sr8200. I still get drop-outs every once in awhile with DVD's, but i do not get them while listening to music anymore.
     
  6. Gordon C Jr

    Gordon C Jr Stunt Coordinator

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  7. ThomasL

    ThomasL Supporting Actor

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    I have a Toshiba SD-2700 hooked up to a Pioneer receiver and have experienced very brief audio dropouts (less than second) on the T2 DVD DTS audio track. They occurred at the exact same spot every time. Since it was so brief, it was hard to tell if the video also "skipped" but it didn't appear to. Since it occurs at the exact same spot and is completely consistent, I chalked this up as a compatibility problem with the DVD player and the disc although I guess it also could be between the DVD player and the receiver. It seems other people over at audioreview.com have also reported audio skips with the Toshiba SD2700/4700/5700 line of dvd players. Besides T2, I haven't experienced any others.

    cheers,

    --tom
     
  8. Jason Wolters

    Jason Wolters Stunt Coordinator

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  9. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

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    Ah yes! The good ol' audio dropout phenomenon.

    I really wish there was an official statement/explanation from the manufacturer's. It has been my experience that audio dropouts are most often caused by a certain combination of DVD players with certain receivers. For example some earlier Toshiba DVD players in combination with certain Sony receivers caused dropouts. If you used the same DVD player with another type or model of receiver then no dropouts existed. Similarly, if you used the same receiver with another brand or model of DVD player then no dropouts existed again either.

    When I got the Toshiba 2108 DVD player and used it with a Sony 925 receiver, I had dropouts. Another member had dropouts with this combination but let it be known that the Toshiba 3108 did not have any dropouts. I exchanged for the 3108 and no dropouts ever.
     
  10. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

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    I just read the other posts. I think there are about 3 or 4 different problems people are reporting here...

    1- Intermittant audio dropouts (random)

    2- Specific audio dropouts (same spot on disk)

    3- Layer changes (audio dropout at that spot)

    4- Signal lock (a receiver delay due to time it takes to recognize a new type of signal).

    -------------

    1- DVD player/Receiver combination

    2- DVD disk

    3- Usually DVD player-related. (may get long video pause)

    4- Receiver related. Some receivers take a long time to lock onto a new type of signal. Some DVD disks have the menus in DD2.0 but when the movie starts to play, the signal switches to DD5.1 or dts 5.1 and some receivers take a couple of seconds to recognize the new signal, hence the audio dropout at that point.
     
  11. ThomasL

    ThomasL Supporting Actor

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    Neil I would agree with your list except I believe the cause of #2 can be the dvd player (perhaps in combination with the disk). I played the DTS soundtrack of T2 on an SD1600 and there was no audio blip/dropout at the same point as on the SD2700. Interesting to say the least. of course, the SD2700 also played a few rentals that the SD1600 had trouble with.

    cheers,

    --tom
     

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