Audio Cables

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Mike Cohen, Mar 16, 2001.

  1. Mike Cohen

    Mike Cohen Auditioning

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    We're seeting up a room for HT, and we want to install audio cables in the walls with jacks running from the location we'll have the receiver to each of the speakers. We don't know exactly what kind of speakers, or what kind of receiver, or what kind of connection yet, but we need to install this wiring before the drywall goes up. What kind of wiring should we use? Is the Monster Cable stuff really worth it? I know this will probably be a divided issue, but we're looking for a nice low-impedence, low interference cable, and would love it if someone could suggest a good one.
    Thanks!
    -Mike
     
  2. Brian Corr

    Brian Corr Supporting Actor

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    I take it you mean speaker cable when you say audio cable. I think that monster is overrated and overpriced. You can order online from a place like www.markertek.com ( I like canare stuff) or go to your local home depot/lowes and buy some 10 to 14 gauge speaker wire. YOu may want to go ahead and purchase in-wall cable as opposed to the traditional copper stuff in a clear sleeve. You don't want to have a problem with a bldg. inspector using something not approved for in-wall use.
     
  3. andyg

    andyg Agent

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    I purchased a 500' roll of 2 pair 14ga wire from a local electronics store here in Mass. It is CL3 rated and was very easy to work with. You should check your local building codes before installing wire behind a wall. Here in Mass it must be UL rated for in-wall use. Otherwise there could be problems if a fire ever occured and the wiring helped spread the fire. Using in-wall rated wire wasn't that much more than conventional speaker wire.
    --Andy Garabedian
     
  4. Mike Cohen

    Mike Cohen Auditioning

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    I was looking at 12 & 10 gauge speaker wire at radio shack, but noticed that it was not shielded. Would shielding make a difference?
    Thanks!
    -Mike
     
  5. ChrisY

    ChrisY Auditioning

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    I used Liberty THX speaker cable in my walls. It cost me about $.75/ft. Excellent cable and it is certified for use in walls. It is 12 guage, which should be more than adequate for your speakers.
     
  6. Phil A

    Phil A Producer

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    Shielding should not be a factor unless the wires needed to be run next to an electrical source or line. If that were the case, you could shield them with copper tape made by 3M at a reasonable price. Home Depot's stuff is not horrible either, the 4x16 gauge is $0.24/foot.
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  7. RAF

    RAF Lead Actor

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    Anyone installing speaker wire in a wall for a HT installation should consider future as well as current use. Unless you plan to install tubing (so the wires can be changed easily) I would recommend 12 gauge OFC (oxygen free copper). This is a large enough diameter (remember, the smaller the gauge number the larger the diameter) for just about any speaker situaton, now and in the future. Lower gauges (like 10, etc.) become too difficult to bend and maneuver and don't really give any additional sonic benefit of any consequence. And smaller wires (especially anything above 16 gauge) are not generally regarded as being as good as 12 gauge.
    I puchased my wire from parts express in a bulk roll of 500' and it worked out to about 28 cents a foot. Similar materials are available from places like Home Depot for around 30-40 cents a foot in smaller quantities.
    Remember to leave enough slack at both ends for the inevitable changes that you will make. A little bit of extra length won't hurt, but too short a wire is a pain to legthen after the fact.
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    RAF
    [Demented Video Dude since 1997]
    [Computer Maven since 1956]
    ["PITA" since 1942]
    My HT (latest update 02/05/01)
     

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