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Audio Cable

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Matthew_F, Dec 1, 2002.

  1. Matthew_F

    Matthew_F Stunt Coordinator

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    Hi,

    Would an analog audio cable have the same rating as a coaxial cable (ie. ohms)?

    Thanks
     
  2. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

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    Well, audio cable is actually 50 ohm and usually good quality coax (RG6) is 75ohm- but usually this is fine. I assume you mean adding RCA connections to coax cable for interconnects? If so- it works- although the traditional solid core RG6 style stuff is pretty rigid...

    Without getting into too much complexity- there are a couple schools of thought in terms of using 75ohm coax for a 50ohm analog audio connection (both pro and con)-- but bottom line is I've used 75ohm and have never heard a difference.

    -Vince
     
  3. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    No.

    First, almost all audio interconnects (with RCA plugs on the end) are made with coax. If you cut it, it will look a lot like your ordinary CATV coax.

    Audio can be made with 50/75/110/300 ohm coax cable.

    Video Cables, Coaxial-Digital cables and your Sat/CATV coax must all be made with 75 ohm coax.

    It as you get to the higher-frequency signals that the signals become sensitive to the impedence of the device receiving the signal. These are by convention 75 ohms. So to pass the signal, the coax (and connectors) should be made with 75 ohm coax.

    Does this help?
     
  4. Matthew_F

    Matthew_F Stunt Coordinator

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    In a way it does, now I know what other ohm ratings which are out there.
    Well actaully I'm trying to buy Acoustic Research Master Series audio cables but the store I want to get it from only carrys the analog ones, and not the coaxial but I want the coaxial.
    Analog
    http://www.araccessories.com/masters...asp?category=1
    Coax
    http://www.araccessories.com/masters...1&sub=6&prod=1
    I've heard that the analog could be the same as the coax but AR doesn't list the specs so I have no idea if they are the exact same thing but with a different label on them. If somebody knows the answer, I would appreciate it =)
     
  5. GeorgeTW

    GeorgeTW Stunt Coordinator

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    The type of audio cable becomes more important for distance. A standard stereo connection is unbalanced, so shielding minimizes the inductive pickup inherant in a long piece of wire (example, running around the perimeter of a room).
    Coax cable only has an advantage if it's shielded properly.

    Most coax have a foil wrap that provides 99% shield BUT ONLY if the wrap isn't damaged before it is placed(due to excessive flexing). A coax cable from radio shack has such a skimpy wire weave that, IMHO does more harm to the foil than anything else.

    The other differance between RCA and a Coax has to do with stranded vs solid wire. Over the short haul, they should sound similar enuff if properly soldered.

    One notable exception is the cheap 'supplied' wires that comes with every Walmart stereo. These are connections that might have 3 individual strands running thru them, b-a-r-e-l-y making a connection. Avoid Avoid Avoid.
     
  6. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    I see.

    When you say "analog", you are really talking about a twisted-pair design.

    Short Answer: the master series cables with twisted-pair wires will work fine.

    For audio, the impedence of the cable is not usually an issue. (because impedence rolls off the high frequency signals).

    But there are other issues for audio.

    Capacitance will affect the low frequency sounds. On a coax cable this is not a huge problem, but it IS there.

    A twisted-pair design on a cable is actually considered superior for audio. This is why the higher-end cables are built this way.

    Unless you are trying to buy video cables to use as audio cables so you have flexability, go ahead and get the twisted-pair cables.
     
  7. Matthew_F

    Matthew_F Stunt Coordinator

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    Hi Bob,
    Thank you for the info. I will purchase the audio cables then =).
     
  8. Matthew_F

    Matthew_F Stunt Coordinator

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    Actaully I changed my mind and going to get the coax because I should of paid more attention toe the AR site. Just noticed that it actaully showed the picture of the inside and did see the difference of the coax/stereo cables.
     

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