Attaching a plate amp on sonosub ?

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Neil Joseph, Oct 2, 2003.

  1. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

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    Going to make another sub. This time I want to attach a plate amp onto the back on the sonotube. What is the best way to do this?
     
  2. TimForman

    TimForman Supporting Actor

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  3. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

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    How do you attach a plate amp and do you have to seal it against leaks. Trying to secure a flat amp to a curved surface is posing some design challenges.
     
  4. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    Yes, you will need to make sure there are no air leaks if you go down this road of installing a plate amp to the side of a sonotube enclosure.

    It's a really pain because you have to carve out pieces of MDF/wood that have a curvature that follows the tube, and incorporate that into a "sink" type of structure that would be attached to the hole for the amp on the side of the sonotube. If you've ever seen a SVS subwoofer, they have some nifty plastic injection molding for their plate amp attachment "harness".

    One of our member did this with MDF/wood, but I can't remember who it was.
     
  5. Pete Mazz

    Pete Mazz Supporting Actor

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    If you use a 1/4" bit to route the circular end caps, just use the fall off as your curved ribs.

    Pete
     
  6. Brian-K-Owens

    Brian-K-Owens Stunt Coordinator

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    I build mine as Pete says. As you cut the caps, use a couple of sections of the drop off to build a stand-off for the amp. But, this is the opposite of the SVS enclosures. Looks like their method could be done by cutting two pieces of wood with the same radius as an inner cap along with a backplate. This is actually how I plan to build my next one so the amp does not protrude out of the tube.

    My web browser is screwed up, but here is a link to the picture of the SVS if you have not seen it:

    http://www.svsubwoofers.com/images/s...cplusrear2.jpg

    Brian
     
  7. Tommy T

    Tommy T Stunt Coordinator

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    I did mine by cutting an extra endcap out of MDF. Then it was just a matter of sanding it down a little to make it flush.
    Once you screw it onto the tube it's pretty sturdy. I made sure I used glue when attaching it and after the glue dried, I went around every seam, inside and out with sealant. It looks a lot more difficult than it actually is.

    You can see images of how I did it on my webpage.

    Tommy
     
  8. Dustin B

    Dustin B Producer

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  9. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

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    Dustin, in your example, is the entire plate amp on the outside of the sonotube? If so, is that enclosure enough to allow for cooling of the amp? And did you simply make a small hole in the sonotube to allow the cables to pass through to the driver?

    Please, more details? [​IMG]
     
  10. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    Plate amp use their fins for the cooling. So as long as the heat sink fins are exposed and aren't closed off to air flow, cooling shouldn't be a problem.
     
  11. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

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    So if you build a box just large enough for the plate amp to fit inside then this is sufficient cooling for the unit, right?
     
  12. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    Yup!
     
  13. Dustin B

    Dustin B Producer

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    My method results in 6 screw holes and one hole for the wire that need to be caulked. But it's much easier to make sure those 7 holes are sealed then a flush mounting. Mind you it doesn't look as good as the flush mount.

    I drilled a bunch of 3/8" holes in the top and bottom of my mount to aid in cooling, likely wasn't necessary but I did it anyways.

    http://dustin.bunnyhug.net/construct...%20Amp%20Mount
     
  14. Michael Hartwig

    Michael Hartwig Stunt Coordinator

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    Why attach the plate amp to the sonotube?
    I made an octagonal sub enclosure and have the plate amp in a seperate box that is setup with my other stereo equipment in the stereo rack. Looks good, good cooling, easy access and less weight in the sub enclosure.
     
  15. Hank Frankenberg

    Hank Frankenberg Cinematographer

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    I made an MDF enclosure to attach my plate amp to my 24" dia sonosub. I used the same diameter circle jig that I constructed to make my end cap plugs, so the enclosure ends fit snug. I screwed it on from the inside, drilled a hole throught the sonotube for the amp wires, then caulked the hole. I drill some cooling holes in the top and bottom of the enclosure for airflow to inner amp components, but the key to cooling is the vertically aligned cooling fins on the plate amp. Pics on the first page:
    http://www.geocities.com/hankbond1/index
    Why would you put the amp in a separate box is my question.
     
  16. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

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    I actually may go that route. I prewired the room when they were building the house so I have RG6 going to the location, terminated with F-RCA adaptors at each end. I don't have the amp yet but I assume that the plate amps come with the option of hooking up via coax as well as via speaker wires, correct?
     
  17. Russell R

    Russell R Stunt Coordinator

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    I have a separate box for the plate amp. This way I am not physically tied to this amp.

    RODERPLEX

    My sub and amp box can be seen on my site.

    Russ
     
  18. Michael Hartwig

    Michael Hartwig Stunt Coordinator

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    Hank
    On a tubular shape especially, I feel the protrusion of an attached plate amp doesn't look esthetically pleasing. Plus if the plate amp is in its own box close to the the main amp you only have to deal with shorter input cables. Its easier to run speaker wire to longer lengths.
    But then each to his/her own.
     
  19. Hank Frankenberg

    Hank Frankenberg Cinematographer

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    Michael, if the wiring is your motivation, that's your choice and valid. "Protrusion" is not a big deal, IMO, as I have the sonosub in its alcove with the amp on the back, so it's not visible. Even against a wall, the amp can be on the backside and not seen. The enclosure is actually quite shallow. Anyway, you're correct - to each his own. Quality bass/LFE is the goal.
     
  20. AndyF

    AndyF Agent

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    Neil,

    I attached my amp to the side of my Sonotube a little differently. Instead of drilling holes in the side of my tube, I made the bottom plate with a shelf on the side that functioned as the bottom of my amp enclosure. (The plate looks kind of like a key hole.) I made the sides and top of the amp enclosure out of the remaining MDF.

    There's two cutouts in the inner and outer bottom plates for the speaker connectors and a cutout for a speaker connector in the space where the amp is housed. I run about 8in of speaker cable from one connector to the other to make the connections.

    Here's a cut sheet I sketched:
    https://farrior.dyndns.org/~andy/hom...F-cutsheet.gif

    (Pardon the prompt. I had to reconfigure my web server for https when my ISP blocked inbound http traffic. Argh!)

    I don't have any pictures. Sorry. Don't have the correct toy for that.

    As for the coax connections, I did it the same way. I have RG6 everywhere running to a central point. I used an F-to-RCA adapter on both ends of the coax so I could connect the line level input to the sub amp.

    Andy
     

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