At Last a refreshing film list - REBEL CINEMA

Discussion in 'Movies' started by Jim_K, May 15, 2004.

  1. Jim_K

    Jim_K Executive Producer

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    I stumbled upon this list through filmsite.org, a great site for film buffs though they focus primarily on American/English language films.

    Taken from Premiere Magazine's Oct '98 issue (yeah it's a little old) it was meant as a response to the AFI's 100 Best Films as none of the films appear on the AFI list. "Rebel Cinema or 100 Movies That Shook the World, celebrating the filmmakers (and their films) who dared to be ridiculous, offensive, or even unpopular, and who still came up with classic films. "

    Because of the intent of this list rather then some pompous attempt to list the greatest films (AFI - S&S) it's a refreshing list of 100 films that should be seen. I've seen 75 of these & while not all are my cup of tea, this is one of the most interesting list's I've come across. Maybe if there's enough interest I'll run a Film Challenge with this list.

    This list is not ranked but rather in alphabetical order.

    100 MOST DARING MOVIES EVER MADE

    Airplane! (1980), d. Jim Abrahams, David Zucker, Jerry Zucker

    Akira (1989), d. Katsuhiro Otomo

    Animal Crackers (1930), d. Victor Heerman

    Badlands (1973), d. Terrence Malick

    Bananas (1971), d. Woody Allen

    Battleship Potemkin (1925), d. Sergei Eisenstein

    Belle de Jour (1967), d. Luis Bunuel

    The Birds (1963), d. Alfred Hitchcock

    Blade Runner, d. Ridley Scott

    Blazing Saddles (1974), d. Mel Brooks

    Blow-Up (1966), d. Michelangelo Antonioni

    Blue Velvet (1986), d. David Lynch

    Bob Le Flambeur (1955), d. Jean-Pierre Melville

    Brazil (1985), d. Terry Gilliam

    Breathless (1959), d. Jean-Luc Godard

    Bride of Frankenstein (1935), d. James Whale

    Cat People (1942), d. Jacques Tourneur

    Un Chien Andalou (1928), d. Luis Bunuel and Salvador Dali

    The Conformist (1971), d. Bernardo Bertolucci

    The Conversation (1974), d. Francis Ford Coppola

    Crimes and Misdemeanors (1989), d. Woody Allen

    The Crowd (1928) , d. King Vidor

    Dead Ringers (1988), d. David Cronenberg

    Detour (1945), d. Edgar G. Ulmer

    The Devil in Miss Jones (1973), d. Gerard Damiano

    Dirty Harry (1971), d. Don Siegel

    Don't Look Back (1967), d. D.A. Pennebaker

    Do the Right Thing (1989), d. Spike Lee

    Drugstore Cowboy (1989), d. Gus Van Sant

    Dumbo (1941), d. Ben Sharpsteen

    8 1/2 (1963), d. Federico Fellini

    Eyes Without a Face (1959), d. Georges Franju

    Faces (1968), d. John Cassavetes

    Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill! (1965), d. Russ Meyer

    Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982), d. Amy Heckerling

    Flesh (1968), d. Paul Morrissey

    The 400 Blows (1959), d. Francois Truffaut

    Freaks (1932), d. Tod Browning

    The Gang's All Here (1943), d. Busby Berkeley

    The Girl Can't Help It (1956), d. Frank Tashlin

    The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly (1966), d. Sergio Leone

    Halloween (1978), d. John Carpenter

    A Hard Day's Night (1965), d. Richard Lester

    The Harder They Come (1973), d. Perry Henzell

    The Hustler (1961), d. Robert Rossen

    If.... (1968), d. Lindsay Anderson

    In the Company of Men (1997), d. Neil LaBute

    Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956), d. Don Siegel

    Johnny Guitar (1954), d. Nicholas Ray

    Jules et Jim (1961), d. Francois Truffaut

    The Killer (1989), d. John Woo

    The Killing (1956), d. Stanley Kubrick

    Kiss Me Deadly (1955), d. Robert Aldrich

    The Last Picture Show (1971), d. Peter Bogdanovich

    Last Tango in Paris (1973), d. Bernardo Bertolucci

    The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962), d. John Ford

    Man With a Movie Camera (1929), d. Dziga Vertov

    The Marriage of Maria Braun (1978), d. Rainer Werner Fassbinder

    Mean Streets (1973), d. Martin Scorsese

    Medium Cool (1969), d. Haskell Wexler

    Metropolis (1926), d. Fritz Lang

    Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1974), d. Terry Gilliam and Terry Jones

    My Brilliant Career (1979), d. Gillian Armstrong

    Nashville (1975), d. Robert Altman

    The Night of the Hunter (1955), d. Charles Laughton

    Night of the Living Dead (1968), d. George A. Romero

    Nosferatu (1922), d. F. W. Murnau

    Olympia (1938), d. Leni Riefenstahl

    Open City (1946), d. Roberto Rossellini

    Pandora's Box (1928), d. G. W. Pabst

    Peeping Tom (1960), d. Michael Powell

    Persona (1966), d. Ingmar Bergman

    The Piano (1993), d. Jane Campion

    Pink Flamingos (1972), d. John Waters

    Raising Arizona (1987), d. Joel Coen

    Rashomon (1950), d. Akira Kurosawa

    Repulsion (1965), d. Roman Polanski

    Reservoir Dogs (1992), d. Quentin Tarantino

    Ride the High Country (1962), d. Sam Peckinpah

    The Road Warrior (1981), d. George Miller

    The Rules of the Game (1939), d. Jean Renoir

    Scarface (1932), d. Howard Hawks

    Scarface (1983), d. Brian De Palma

    Seconds (1966), d. John Frankenheimer

    The Seven Samurai (1954), d. Akira Kurosawa

    Shaft (1971), d. Gordon Parks

    Sherlock, Jr. (1924), d. Buster Keaton

    Shock Corridor (1963), d. Sam Fuller

    Stranger Than Paradise (1984), d. Jim Jarmusch

    Sullivan's Travels (1941), d. Preston Sturges

    Sweet Smell of Success (1957), d. Alexander Mackendrick

    Swept Away By An Unusual Destiny In the Blue Sea of August (1975), d. Lina Wertmuller

    The Terminator (1984), d. James Cameron

    The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974), d. Tobe Hooper

    The Thin Blue Line (1988), d. Errol Morris

    Touch Of Evil (1958), d. Orson Welles

    Trainspotting (1996), d. Danny Boyle

    28-Up (1985), d. Michael Apted

    Walkabout (1971), d. Nicolas Roeg

    Zero For Conduct (1933), d. Jean Vigo


    thoughts?
     
  2. SteveGon

    SteveGon Executive Producer

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    Pretty nice list (seen 83 of 'em). [​IMG]
     
  3. John Kilduff

    John Kilduff Screenwriter

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    Some of these titles would later end up on the specialty lists (Laughs, Thrills, et cetera).

    Good picks, though.

    Sincerely,

    John Kilduff...

    Hooray for "Scarface"!
     
  4. Ernest Rister

    Ernest Rister Producer

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    ROFLMAO!

    The 100 Most Daring Movies Ever Made - and it lists DUMBO - but not FANTASIA?!? The first stereo/surround film ever made, with Walt Disney animating bare-breasted witches and demons and dinosaurs eating each other, Walt's animators defy creationists and they actually show evolution just a dozen or so years after the Scopes Monkey Trial, Fantasia sports the first pure examples of American abstract animation, Mickey is his own worst enemy, a side-splitting satire of ballet, Walt dares to stake a claim that anmation is an art form and (brain explodes)....DUMBO!?!? Not even Snow White (1st American animated narrative feature), Pinocchio (most acclaimed animated feature), Fantasia (light-years ahead of its time) or Bambi (a film that has played a crucial part in the modern American drive to preserve nature)...but DUMBO?!? Why - "Pink Elephants on Parade"? An elephant drinking champagne?

    Bzzzzzt.

    Don't need to read the rest of the list. Waste of time.
     
  5. Walter Kittel

    Walter Kittel Producer

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    You have problems with 1% of the list so the entire thing is crap. Um, okay.

    No list is ever going to satisfy everyone, but that list does have some pretty solid titles on it. Any list that has such a diverse collection of well known and lesser known gems on it is okay with me. Thanks for posting, Jim.

    - Walter.
     
  6. Ernest Rister

    Ernest Rister Producer

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    "You have problems with 1% of the list so the entire thing is crap. Um, okay."

    That 1% is enough to dissuade me from reading the other 99%.
     
  7. george kaplan

    george kaplan Executive Producer

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    Seen 68

    Loved 18

    Hated 20

    No need to ever see again, but didn't inspire hatred - 30

    One I most would like to see that I haven't - The Devil in Miss Jones [​IMG]
     
  8. Haggai

    Haggai Producer

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    Both Snow White (#49) and Fantasia (#58) were on the AFI Top 100 list, although Pinocchio and Bambi weren't. I presume that's also why Reservoir Dogs is on there without Pulp Fiction (#95 on AFI).
     
  9. David_Blackwell

    David_Blackwell Screenwriter

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    I love most of the list, but I think Seconds is overrated an Belle De Jouur just sucks (talk about such a tame and boring movie).
     
  10. Haggai

    Haggai Producer

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    Some great movies on this list, I'm glad to see some props for Drugstore Cowboy, which I adore. I've seen about half the list, and there are a few that I think are overrated, notably The Harder They Come. Magnificent soundtrack, but the movie is underwhelming. I thought City Of God was reminiscent of it in some ways (along with the more obvious Scarface/Goodfellas-type gangster film influences), only billions of times better. One of the best movies I've ever seen, and it would have to be on any self-respecting updated version of this list.
     
  11. andrew markworthy

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    Presumably the same applied when you first picked up a mathematics book - you cited 2% of the list. [​IMG]

    It's an interesting list (and I've seen most of the films listed) but having said that, the AFI is very insular in its views, so I've never taken it very seriously. IMHO rather better lists are the once-a-decade BFI and for arthouse movies only, the annual Cannes prize-winners.
     
  12. Jim_K

    Jim_K Executive Producer

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    Er... whatever I guess. To each his/her own.

    For anyone else who's interested here's the actual write-up from the issue.

    Dumbo (1941), d. Ben Sharpsteen
    " Because of its high-brow musical premise, Fantasia (1940) is often considered to be the height of Disney animation - and a great date movie for stoners. But Fantasia looks almost elephantine next to this surreal, 64-minute cartoon classic, the coming-of-age saga of a pachyderm with massive ears. And stoners beware: It also features the eerily inebriated "Pink Elephants on Parade." "


    For George [​IMG]

    The Devil in Miss Jones (1973), d. Gerard Damiano
    " The "porno chic" movement that began when Dimiano's Deep Throat was found to be not obscene reached an aesthetic crest with this lavishly produced, woman-centered fantasy of hard-core sex. Georgina Spelvin's Miss Jones introduced many an innocent American to oily massages, snake-swallowing, multiple partners, and bisexuality. "


    Actually I originally wanted to post all of the write-ups (It helps put the list in perspective & makes it more chat-worthy) but was unsure if it might be against forum policy to do so. Again the list is from a 6 year old magazine issue but is posted up on another unrelated site.

    Is there a Moderator out there who can give me the say so if this is OK or not? If not I'll just post a link.
     
  13. Tim_C

    Tim_C Stunt Coordinator

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    Interesting list (though I've only seen about 20 of the movies on it.) I don't hate the AFI lists like some people do (yes, they mostly ignored any cult or 'lesser known' classics, but a large majority of the films they chose were still among the greatest ever made.) But it's always nice to see some smaller, less hyped lists. (And it's always great to see one of my favorite films of all time, The Crowd, on any list of great movies.)
     
  14. Mike Broadman

    Mike Broadman Producer

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    This thread gave me a lot of stuff to put on my Netflix queue. Thanks!
     
  15. Zen Butler

    Zen Butler Producer

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    Fun little list. I wouldn't say Scarface '83 belongs there but hopefully some conversation will ensue.

    Ones I would second:
    Akira
    Touch of Evil
    Persona
    Rashomon


    A few I would have liked on the list:

    Platoon
    Killing Fields
    Battle of Algiers
    Schindler's List
     
  16. Arman

    Arman Screenwriter

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    Overall, a thumb-up [​IMG] from me.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] for the following (daring masterworks made by the rebels & geniuses of world cinema are bolded):

    Airplane! (1980), d. Jim Abrahams, David Zucker, Jerry Zucker
    Akira (1989), d. Katsuhiro Otomo
    Badlands[/color] (1973), d. Terrence Malick
    Battleship Potemkin (1925), d. Sergei Eisenstein
    Belle de Jour (1967), d. Luis Bunuel
    The Birds (1963), d. Alfred Hitchcock
    Blow-Up (1966), d. Michelangelo Antonioni
    Blue Velvet (1986), d. David Lynch
    Bob Le Flambeur (1955), d. Jean-Pierre Melville
    Breathless (1959), d. Jean-Luc Godard
    Bride of Frankenstein (1935), d. James Whale
    Crimes and Misdemeanors (1989), d. Woody Allen
    Do the Right Thing (1989), d. Spike Lee
    8 1/2 (1963), d. Federico Fellini
    The 400 Blows (1959), d. Francois Truffaut
    The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly (1966), d. Sergio Leone
    A Hard Day's Night (1965), d. Richard Lester
    The Hustler (1961), d. Robert Rossen
    Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956), d. Don Siegel
    Jules et Jim (1961), d. Francois Truffaut
    The Killing (1956), d. Stanley Kubrick
    The Last Picture Show (1971), d. Peter Bogdanovich
    Last Tango in Paris (1973), d. Bernardo Bertolucci
    The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962), d. John Ford
    Man With a Movie Camera (1929), d. Dziga Vertov
    Mean Streets (1973), d. Martin Scorsese
    Metropolis (1926), d. Fritz Lang
    Nashville (1975), d. Robert Altman
    The Night of the Hunter (1955), d. Charles Laughton
    Nosferatu (1922), d. F. W. Murnau
    Open City (1946), d. Roberto Rossellini
    Persona (1966), d. Ingmar Bergman
    Rashomon (1950), d. Akira Kurosawa
    Reservoir Dogs (1992), d. Quentin Tarantino
    The Rules of the Game (1939), d. Jean Renoir
    The Seven Samurai (1954), d. Akira Kurosawa
    Stranger Than Paradise (1984), d. Jim Jarmusch
    Sullivan's Travels (1941), d. Preston Sturges
    Sweet Smell of Success (1957), d. Alexander Mackendrick
    The Terminator (1984), d. James Cameron
    Touch Of Evil (1958), d. Orson Welles

    I'm surprised with the absence of Nanook of the North, Citizen Kane, Pulp Fiction, 2001: A Space Odyssey, Underground, Some Like It Hot, M, The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, Rocco & His Brothers, Easy Rider, Rio Bravo, JFK and a couple or more each from Bunuel, Hitchcock, Godard and Kubrick in this list.

    I want to see (including all the films I mentioned above) The Triplets of Belleville, Dogville, Kill Bill Volume I & II, Artificial Intelligence, City of God, Being John Malkovich, Mulholland Dr, Atanarjuat, Elephant, Spirited Away, Eyes Wide Shut, Irreversible (and many more) in the next version of this list.
     
  17. Haggai

    Haggai Producer

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    There's no overlap with the AFI list by design.
     
  18. Arman

    Arman Screenwriter

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    Duh! I did'nt even read the comments/other opinions (including Jim's explanation) in this thread until your post. So hmmm ... this is is not a definitive daring/rebel cinema list ... I have to take back my overall thumb up seal of approval. [​IMG]
     
  19. Steve Christou

    Steve Christou Long Member

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    I would have picked Life of Brian rather than Monty Python and the Holy Grail, far more daring (was Holy Grail daring?) and at the time was banned in some regions for mocking religionism and religious hypocrisy.
     
  20. Zen Butler

    Zen Butler Producer

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    Understood, although many from the original AFI are groundbreaking regardless. I mentioned the films only to induce conversation.

    Steve, that is a great pick.
     

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