Aspect ratio question...

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Dave Poehlman, Mar 25, 2002.

  1. Dave Poehlman

    Dave Poehlman Producer

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    Do DVD manufacurers necessarily use the "original" aspect ratio when creating a widescreen DVD?

    The reason I ask, is I just bought Time Bandits off of the clearance rack for $8.99 and it's in a 16:9 ratio. However if you watch it the opening title is cropped off on the sides to read:

    Code:
     T I M E
    
    A N D I T
    
    


    Which had me wondering if the movie was orginally a 2.35:1 film and they just stuck it in a 16X9 and called it widescreen.

    Or is it just a poor layout job by the people doing the title?
     
  2. Marc Rochkind

    Marc Rochkind Second Unit

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    No idea about Time Bandits specifically, but, yes, with very few exceptions a widescreen DVD is OAR. There are always errors, of course, which sounds like this case.
     
  3. Dan Hitchman

    Dan Hitchman Cinematographer

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    It is also very possible that your TV has:

    1) too much overscan

    2) a picture shifted slightly to the left

    Sometimes a mis-framed transfer or the burned in titles of the original film itself does not take into consideration overscan on a TV so the lettering will go to the extreme edges of the frame, which the TV will simply shift into its overscan range.

    A digital front projector using DLP, LCD, or D-ILA usually has no overscan and very minimal pixel cropping on the extreme edges, so you pretty much see the entire video frame.

    Dan
     
  4. Dave Poehlman

    Dave Poehlman Producer

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  5. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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    Calibration discs like AVIA and Video Essentials have patterns that can help you determine the amount of overscan on your TV. Reducing overscan usually involves recalibrating the entire picture, since it affects geometry, convergence (on RPTVs), focus, etc. It's not something to be undertaken lightly.

    Bear in mind that a certain amount of overscan is unavoidable on almost anything other than a front projector. Consumer TVs generally aren't designed to give you every last bit of image. They'd be a lot more expensive if they were.

    M.
     

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