Are these good?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by ChrisHeflen, Mar 6, 2003.

  1. ChrisHeflen

    ChrisHeflen Supporting Actor

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  2. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    The Fusion line from Radio Shack is new so the jury is still out. The cables from the custom sites use professional grade Canare/Belden coax. The Fusion cables are pretty, the pro stuff is hard, stiff, ugly. But a cable that fights tight bends is better for the signals.

    No comparison - use the stuff the pros use.
     
  3. RayJK

    RayJK Stunt Coordinator

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    I've been into audio for 35 years but this is a new one to me.
     
  4. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    When the frequencies get higher, reflections become a problem. (We are talking MegaHz here, not audio that tops out at about 22 khz). To solve this, the signals need to see a uniform 75 ohm impedence through both connectors and the coax to the destination.

    Coax cables work by suspending a center wire in the middle of a "pipe" and maintaining a uniform distance between these two. This means they share the same axis which is why we call it "Co Axial" or coax.

    A tight bend in a coaxial cable changes the uniform distance at that point. This is visible/measurable with video analysis equipment. (See some of the tech notes on the Belden web site).

    So a thick outer sheath that fights tight bends helps maintain the uniform impedence of the cable.

    This also applies to computer network cable. To maintain catagory 5 network compatability, the cable can have no more than 4 90 degree bends in the run.
     

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