Are there really "Hi-Def" Antennas?

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by DanielKellmii, Sep 12, 2006.

  1. DanielKellmii

    DanielKellmii Supporting Actor

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    I know that has been discussed before. There really is no such thing as a "High-Def" antenna, but I told that to somebody and he wouldn't believe me. Is there anything that I can show him about this? Or, am I wrong?
     
  2. DougR

    DougR Second Unit

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  3. JeremyErwin

    JeremyErwin Producer

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    To me, an HDTV antenna is a "really good UHF antenna", because, at present, most ATSC is broadcast on the UHF bands. At some point, however, the old NTSC broadcasts will shut down, and the old VHF frequencies will be reclaimed. This may make dedicated UHF antennas obsolete.
     
  4. DanielKellmii

    DanielKellmii Supporting Actor

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    Do you mean VHF?
     
  5. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    If people want to be ignorant, that's not your problem.

    Any ordinary UHF antenna is a servicable "High-Def" antenna. If this person wants to feel good about the $150 they spent on a Terk piece of trash, let them.
     
  6. Charlie Campisi

    Charlie Campisi Screenwriter

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    You could show him the $6 set of rabbit ears I use in my bedroom to receive my HD. I bought them in 1994, long before there was broadcast HD.
     
  7. Cameron Yee

    Cameron Yee Executive Producer
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    Yes, go to Goodwill and find a UHF antenna that is absolutely fugly (but obviously operational) and plug it in to his set or tuner. If he still denies it, then he's just being an ass.
     
  8. JeremyErwin

    JeremyErwin Producer

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    No. The dc market has no vhf atsc stations. Since I'm not interested in NTSC, I could invest large sums of money into improving UHF reception. Come 2009, the networks will probably reclaim their vhf frequencies for digital broadcasts. It would make my old antenna obsolete, as I would have to add vhf elements.
     
  9. videobruce

    videobruce Stunt Coordinator

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    Most markets will be UHF only, but there are some that will resort back to VHF after analog dies.
     
  10. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    Some stations will have a choice of whether they want to keep their older channel assignment or use the new channel given them for simulcasting ATSC. I think it is channels 60 and higher that will be reclaimed in all cities so stations with an original channel in that range must use their other channel after the analog to ATSC changeover is complete.

    At least in my experience, living far from most stations, ATSC needs a "better" antenna compared with NTSC for the same transmitter power a station uses, in order to get a watchable picture. So I expect there are people who will fall for the salesman's pitch of a "hi-def" antenna and actually see better results with on.

    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  11. SteveKNJ

    SteveKNJ Stunt Coordinator

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    OK, all that said, what is a good servicable antenna that would bring in a nice strong signal. I'm in Central NJ, a little closer to NYC but close enough to Philly I could potentially bring in those channels. My past experience is that I've had issues brining in signals OTA. Preferrably, I'd want an indoor antenna as at some point I'll break down and buy an HD Tivo DVR from D*, but my first HD experience will probably be OTA if I can get decent signal.
     
  12. Leo Kerr

    Leo Kerr Screenwriter

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    I'm seeing some confusing response above here... my understanding is that whenever the magic "turn-off" occurs, all VHF channel space (2-13) will be reclaimed by the FCC and used for "first responders" and other similar uses, no matter what (US) market you're in.

    Leo
     
  13. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    Check www.antennaweb.org. If you have a history of "issues brining in signals OTA" I'd say that's not a very good start. I would think a relatively large but not huge outdoor UHF array like the Channel Master CM2241 would be a good choice. However a megamassive directional array like the 2248 may be better. Or two of them, one pointed to NYC one to Philly with a manual switch.
     
  14. Charlie Campisi

    Charlie Campisi Screenwriter

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    One other issue you may face Steve is that if you are trying to get both NY and Philly, you can't use a directional antenna. The omnidirectional antennas are not as good from what I have read. You could use two antennas in tandem, with a 'jointenna' or one of those devices to combat multipath interference.

    As another fyi, directv isn't selling the hd tivo anymore. They are out of stock and they are selling their own hd dvr, the HR20. The HR20 gets locals over the satellite and even though it has internall OTA tuners, they are currently not active. If you specifically want an HD tivo, you can try ebay, or possibly other retailers.
     

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