Are subs for movies only?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Shawn.G, Nov 19, 2002.

  1. Shawn.G

    Shawn.G Second Unit

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    I am wondering if it is smart to get a sub for my two channel system that i use for 80% music. I use two main speakers and then use two bookshelfs as the center channel for my xbox gaming. I have a horrible passive sub now, but i think it really adds to the system though. I won't get my polk mains until xmas. Do i really need a sub or save the money?
     
  2. RichardH

    RichardH Supporting Actor

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    You really need a sub. That is all.
    [​IMG]
     
  3. Steve_Ma

    Steve_Ma Second Unit

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    No one can answer that for you. It's a matter of preference.

    My (subjective) opinion: Many of the nicest tower speakers out there can still sound somewhat anemic for music without a good sub. They key word being “good.” Bad bass will ruin any tune. Think about this. A bass/kick drum can often go well below 30hz and even below 20hz sometimes. How many main speakers (that most of us can afford) are going to handle that cleanly? The answer is not many. They’ll either ignore that material or distort trying to reproduce it. A bass drum is a real common instrument that we hear everyday in our rock/top 40 music. It’s not a pipe organ or cannon shot that is only heard while listening to classical music around the holidays. My point is this: There is a great deal of low bass in the material and music we hear ever day. Many times, we expect our main speakers to handle it, when in truth cannot do it cleanly. Integrating a sub into a 2 ch system is clearly more difficult [than home theater] for a number of reasons and you need to get a good sub. But in my opinion, it’s worth it.

    --Steve
     
  4. Carl Johnson

    Carl Johnson Cinematographer

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    It's hard to say without knowing what kind of system you currently have. You start by saying it's a two channel system then you mension two speakers for the center and a passive sub. If it's a two channel system what's driving the center channel?
     
  5. Shawn.G

    Shawn.G Second Unit

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    Its a 500w RCA 5.1 receiver i am using for my own 3.1 channel configuration. It's not truly just two channel, it has a center channel, but with no rears. I don't use the rear speakers in the back and i have them up front on top of the other bookshelf. The center channel is hooked up to the receiver. When I play xbox games i switch to dsp modes and when i listen to music i use the stereo mode on the receiver.
     
  6. Shawn.G

    Shawn.G Second Unit

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    Oh, i'll probably move the rears to the back of the room where they belong once i get the mains. Then i'll get a sub and actually use my 5.1 receiver for 5.1 and 2 channel by switching modes.
     
  7. Chris Tsutsui

    Chris Tsutsui Screenwriter

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    Hey, I wonder if you can combine the surround signal into mono and play it through your extra center speaker and place that behind the listener? This way you'll get a 4.1 with a center channel...

    Anyways, as for a sub.. 80% music makes me want to suggest that if you got one sub that you thought about placing it between the mains. I found that one sub located in a corner or to the side "may" become noticeable. But since you like to play games and probably have a TV in the middle this probably won't happen.

    I'd say getting a sub depends on how deep your mains can easily go. A main that can extend to 45hz can definitly use the help of a sub while one that extends to 30hz will probably be ok.

    A separate sub also allows you to place the sub in a specific area in the room to allow optimal bass response. Something that may not be possible with the mains because they need to be positioned for imaging and next to the TV.
     
  8. Shawn.G

    Shawn.G Second Unit

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    I have a 10.6 by 12 room. I have the tv in the middle of the 12 side with speakers near the corners and the sub in the middle too. I don't know if i can get 4.1 and change the signal to mono-how do i do that? I will probably go with a new sub. The question is, which one?
     
  9. Dan Hine

    Dan Hine Screenwriter

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  10. Shawn.G

    Shawn.G Second Unit

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    I would like to spend 250-300 max. I have the time/patience/desire to do it and i work well with my hands, but i have never built a speaker before. What are the steps, where do you start? Also, there's someone near me that could probably give me some advice, he knows speakers! I don't want a huge sub, my room is 12 by 10.6, but i wouldn't even mind a large sub. I have enough room on the 12 wall for a large sub.
     

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