Are plasma displays the future of television?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by TomM, Jul 3, 2001.

  1. TomM

    TomM Auditioning

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 1999
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Obviously, plasma tv's are too costly to become mainstream anytime soon. But for the sake of this thread, set aside the issue of cost. I suspect prices will drop like LCD pc monitors have and they will be affordable to many in the next two years.
    My questions are, aside from cost: What are the technological pros and cons of plasma displays vs. RPTV and direct view tvs? Will next generation plasmas outperform HD RPTVs? Do they have artifact or motion drawbacks? Color or brightness weaknesses? What is the relative life of use of plasmas vs. others? Does performance deteriorate?
    Aside from performance, plasmas would seem to have the benefit of less weight and size for apparent shipping and storage savings(should be significant for foriegn producers).
     
  2. Chris White

    Chris White Second Unit

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 1999
    Messages:
    391
    Likes Received:
    0
    Plasma displays will be in very high demand when they reach an appropriate price level. From a technology standpoint, I wouldn't buy one as my main display until one can be produced that is capable of better blacks.
    ------------------
    The Whites' Home Theater Website
    Pictures, DIY Projects, Glossaries, FAQ, Links, Toshiba Tips & Tweaks
     
  3. Jay Mitchosky

    Jay Mitchosky Producer

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 1998
    Messages:
    3,729
    Likes Received:
    0
     
  4. Todd Hochard

    Todd Hochard Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 1999
    Messages:
    2,312
    Likes Received:
    0
    I wonder if they will. I was looking at the specs on one recently (one of the 50" ones), and the power consumption is hideous- nearly 600W! That's twice a big RPTV, and more than 4 times your average Direct View.
    No thanks.
    Todd
     
  5. Dan Hine

    Dan Hine Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2000
    Messages:
    1,312
    Likes Received:
    0
    LCD's have become cheap? yes and no. Samsungs 24" LCD (the largest LCD i know of) is $6000. Hmmm... 24" LCD for $6000 or 42" plasma for $6500 or less? Plasma's dont seem too expensive (relatively of course). But anyway, to the topic at hand I would say it's possible that they will be the future of tv. Plasma's are still pretty new to the consumer market. RPTV's have been around for awhile and even a cheap 46" GE analog set will still cost you a grand. Right now they are most certainly a novelty but the future is a long time. I guess we'll see.
    Dan
     
  6. RANDY FISHER

    RANDY FISHER Second Unit

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 1998
    Messages:
    285
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am a designer for an A/V contractor that does mostly corporate work...board rooms, training facilities and lots of other stuff. A couple of weeks ago a guy from NEC was here and gave a tech seminar to our service people on plasm’s and LCD projectors. I sat it on it. He told us that plasma's have reached that magic 10% market penetration and that the prices would soon drop...he stated that absolutely plasma technology will replace the standard tube TV in the coming years as the price drops and the quality and reliability go up. Speaking of reliability, since these things have really only been on the market for around 5 years or so they really don't know how long they last. The current stated half-life is around 38,000 hours! To put that into perspective an average CRT life span is 10,000 hours. That's 24/7 for over 4 years! He said they may last longer but the technology is too new to tell at this point.
    Later Randy
     
  7. Adam Nixon

    Adam Nixon Second Unit

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 1999
    Messages:
    334
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hopefully this isn't too off topic, but what opinions do you guys have on the future of DLP? There's been a lot of press for "Digital Cinema," but my understanding is that it's still an emerging technology. Professional DLP projectors are allegedly pretty close to 35mm quality (without the scratches and other film artifacts), but I'm of the belief that a true film successor has to exceed film/HDTV resolution -- not match it. Same goes for home projectors. I'm hoping that the technology will eventually replace the CRT -- One can only imagine what a large, bright, big screen experience of the highest video caliber would look like.
     
  8. Ryan Wright

    Ryan Wright Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2000
    Messages:
    1,875
    Likes Received:
    0
     
  9. Allan Mack

    Allan Mack Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    May 26, 2001
    Messages:
    614
    Likes Received:
    0
    What are the differences between plasma and DLP? I've read that either one do not produce blacks very well. Also, DLP is all digital, right? Will either one suffer from burn-in issues?
     
  10. Timmy

    Timmy Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 1998
    Messages:
    160
    Likes Received:
    0
    "Are plasma displays the future of television?"
    I would say they are in the future; but not the future....
    A. They are of fixed pixel design . Unless the source material is exactly matching the plasma/LCD/DLPs' resolution mode; the material will have to be up/down converted to be displayed properly.
    B. Will always have a black level limitation
    C. Will always have the reduced viewing angle limitation
    D. But, will fill the needs of a few special installations.
    I do believe the CRT is here for a long time. Just about 35 miles to the north of me; Matshushita (Panasonic) just built a multi-multi million dollar CRT plant; specializing in flat faced CRT's.
     
  11. Dan Hine

    Dan Hine Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2000
    Messages:
    1,312
    Likes Received:
    0
    Ryan,
    I know that Tom was referring to PC monitors. And the Samsung I referred to IS advertised as a PC monitor, though of course it can be used as a television. But to be fair, I'll drop down a little to an NEC 20" LCD PC Monitor that retails for a little over $3K. After you take that jump from 17" (which by the way, if you could tell me where I could get a 17" LCD for $600 I would be ever grateful) prices soar. What I was trying to accomplish was to show that for the size and resolution that you get with a plasma set, its hard to beat (in terms of a flat panel display. Of course you could pay half what you would pay for a plasma and get an incredible Direct View, RPTV or FPTV.)
    Lastly, in terms of price drops, the 42" plasma I spoke of for $6500 was $8,990 as of December 2000.
    Timmy,
    I agree with you on all but two accounts.
    "Will always have a black level limitation"
    "Will always have the reduced viewing angle limitation"
    Certainly those are issues with plasma sets today. But repeatedly man has done what others said could not be done. The future is a really long time (or so I hope anyway) and who knows what could happen. Remember when color tv first came out people kept their black and white models so they could actually see what it was they were watching. The color smeared (for lack of a better term) the image immensely. I’m glad that changed.
    Or who knows, 15 years from now we'll be saying "Man, remember back in the day when there were plasma televisions?" [​IMG] ...Gotta love technology!
    Of course, these are just my humble views. If you disagree, I applaud you for not being a conformist! [​IMG] Happy 4th of July everyone!
    Dan
     
  12. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 1998
    Messages:
    2,404
    Likes Received:
    0
    That $6500 plasma model, is it a 480 scan line (rows of pixels) unit, or 720?
    I have seen a number of 480 scan line plasma units, those I saw had dot pitch something like 1.50 mm and the gaps between dots (actually vertical stripes) were noticeable resulting in that screen door graininess when sitting less than four screen heights away.
    As far as I know plasma units use colored phosphors as opposed to color filters. The ones I saw did not have really deep reds. MOst direct views also have an orangish red.
    Other video hints:http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  13. Roger Mathus

    Roger Mathus Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 1997
    Messages:
    548
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Central Oregon
    Real Name:
    Roger Mathus
    New models with lower prices and improved contrast ratios and black level claims are being introducerd in Japan. 50 inch can now be purchased for about $ 10k and Hitachi has introduced a 42 inch model for about $ 6k. My first impression from sales floor look is that the new models are improved. Again first impression, but the Pioneer and Panasonic along with the new Sony looked the best.
    On the LCD front, Sharp has had a 28 inch 16x9 TV on the market for about a year now at $ 8k street price.
    I will try to gather some catalogs and post specs and impressions. Sony has finally introduced a plasma model.
     
  14. Peter_A

    Peter_A Second Unit

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 1999
    Messages:
    329
    Likes Received:
    0
    The company I work for sells Plasma's, and so far the only real market for them has been businesses that want them for their boardrooms or lobbies as showoff pieces.
    Sure, I'd like one, but not when I can get a projection TV with almost twice the amount of screen for the same or even less amount of money. And really, the picture on a Plasma TV is not as impressive as a ISF calibrated projection TV. Guess it still comes down to the black levels.
    ------------------
    Peter
    "If rubbin' dirt in your crotch is wrong, hey I don't wanna be right" - Futurama
     
  15. Dan Hine

    Dan Hine Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2000
    Messages:
    1,312
    Likes Received:
    0
    Boy did I screw up!!! In a previous post I mentioned a plasma (a sony, model number escapes me) now $6500 down from $16,000. Well, there are two similar sony plasmas and I was looking at the wrong one. The $6500 price that I have seen is the price down from $8,990. And I have edited my post to be accurate. Allan, it is a 480line model. I did notice a screendoor graniness when viewing it close up but from a distance of about 4-6ft I could not. Though, it could just be my eyes...everyone in my family has glasses but me. Maybe its about time for me too. [​IMG] My local Costco has a different set (also sony, also $6500) but I am not sure of its resolution. I'll see if I can track it down for you.
     
  16. Roger Mathus

    Roger Mathus Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 1997
    Messages:
    548
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Central Oregon
    Real Name:
    Roger Mathus
    I believe that the Sony model at $6500 is the Sony SuperTheater PFM-42B1 plasma monitor. There is a detailed review of this model in the September 2001 issue of Stereophile Guide to Home Theater. Apparently this was developed as a commercial model but also sold for home use. Yesterday I went to a local store in Tokyo and viewed this model. Price was $6400 at the current yen/$ rate of 120. Even on the sales floor, it looked impressive. However, I am concerned about the black level problem associated with all plasma monitors at this time. It is improved in the new models, but enought? Stereophile discussed this matter in some detail.
    In one store I was able to view several brands side by side. On the floor, only the Pioneer and Sony appeared to display the proper color temperature. Others looked rather bluish in comparison.
     
  17. Joseph S

    Joseph S Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 1999
    Messages:
    2,862
    Likes Received:
    0
    The $600 LCDs are mostly analog only. The 22" Apple Cinema Display should drop to $2000 soon though.
    I've got an Apple 17" and it's well worth it for me. It's the equivalent of a 21" CRT and takes up much less space than my previous 2 CRT setup.
    Aren't plasmas still really heavy??
     
  18. Roger Mathus

    Roger Mathus Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 1997
    Messages:
    548
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Central Oregon
    Real Name:
    Roger Mathus
    The 42 inch Sony is 65 pounds.
     
  19. Michael Halse

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2000
    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    0
    Allan,
    Both DLP and LCD are digital, it is the way they are connected to the source. Most sources(computers, dvd players....) output an analogue signal so the projectors and monitors have analogue inputs. The dvd signal is converted to analogue then converted back in the monitor.
     
  20. KeithR

    KeithR Second Unit

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2001
    Messages:
    258
    Likes Received:
    0
    FWIW, I just bought a Panny plasma (the new 4 series) to be delivered on Tuesday.
    This is the only unit that has real blacks, very high contrast, and none of the "moss" effect that plagues plasmas.
    Do a search at avsforum.com...and you will see that no other plasma is even recommended. The Sony is the worst btw...if you are in NYC, go to JandR and see the Panny vs. Philips vs. Sony right next to eachother. The decision was easy after that.
    Oh yeah, prices have come down 1500 bucks in the last few months. I got a great deal on the 42".
    As the the question vs. CRT....for some of us, big, bulky, ugly televisions can't be put in our living rooms. Plasmas take away this problem. No way I am putting in a 400 lb Pioneer Elite (the only RPTV i would buy) in my NYC apartment...The picture is very subjective vs. CRTs. The plasma is 4x brighter, making colors really stand out...and this will kill a CRT, but teh black level is not as good. So bottom line, is it is a trade-off.
    Concerning price, the new Sony 34" direct view is 3999...the new 40" tube is 3500. Plasma is around 5k. the premium is declining on the 42". I will most likely get a 50" in a year, when they get nearer teh 8k range.
     

Share This Page